Once outlaws, in-demand hackers go to cyberwar

BY News Desk  September 11, 2013 at 1:46 PM EST


Creative commons photo via Flickr user powtac.

Hackers are in high demand as cyberwarfare — once the stuff of science fiction — becomes an increasing threat to the data of individuals and companies, and to the United States, including nuclear plants, power grids, trains, water plants and satellites. In 2012, there were 190,000 cyber incidents. There have been more than 214,000 so far this year.

Private security firms and the government are competing for the same talent pool of hackers to try and prevent cyber attacks. David Kushner reports for Rolling Stone on their various recruiting strategies.

Attracting talent can be difficult when the demand for hackers far surpasses the number of qualified geeks. And while patriotism influences some to work for the fed, most decide to work in the private sector where they’re paid more and deal with less hassle, according to the article.

Jayson Street, whose title is “Chief Chaos Coordinator” told Kushner that he would never work for the government.

“The American government has to understand that to get someone who thinks outside the box to work for you, you can’t immediately put them in a box … And that’s the problem.”



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H/T Ellen Rolfes.