Photos: Crowd reacts outside the Supreme Court after marriage equality ruling

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Tevin Johnson-Campion said he was at the court to support his parents, who have been together for 24 years. They married in California in 2008, but their marriage was not previously recognized in their home state of Kentucky. “They are just as deserving of the rights that married couples have,” he said. Photo by Corinne Segal

Tevin Johnson-Campion said he was at the court to support his parents, who have been together for 24 years. They married in California in 2008, but their marriage was not previously recognized in their home state of Kentucky. “They are just as deserving of the rights that married couples have,” he said. Photo by Corinne Segal

In a landmark ruling today, the Supreme Court declared that same-sex couples have the right to marry in any state in the U.S., overturning same-sex marriage bans in 14 states. (Read the full opinion here.)

“Knowing today that my gay friends in Texas can get married gives me shivers.” — Joe Goldman
The ruling came on a meaningful day for many: the two-year anniversary of the Supreme Court’s decision in United States v. Windsor, which determined that the federal government must recognize same-sex marriages performed in states where they were legal. As today’s ruling reached the crowd outside the court, it drew a strong reaction from both supporters and opponents of marriage equality, for whom today was both the culmination of years of work and the harbinger of what work still lies ahead. We spoke with them about their personal connection to the decision.

Judy Walton, a supporter of marriage equality, celebrates the decision outside the Supreme Court on June 26, 2015. (Photo by Corinne Segal)

Judy Walton of Grand Rapids, Michigan, said the decision’s impact would reach beyond the LGBTQ community. “How can anyone have freedom if there are people in our society who don’t have freedom?” she said. Photo by Corinne Segal

Wes Givens and Jane Lanning celebrate the Supreme Court decision on marriage equality at the Supreme Court on June 26, 2015. (Photo by Corinne Segal)

Wes Givens, left, filed a lawsuit against the state of Arkansas in 2013 when it refused to recognize the marriage between him and his partner Beau, which was performed in New York. Jane Lanning, right, said she was there to support everyone’s equal rights. “I’m not here just for me,” she said. Photo by Corinne Segal

Brigid Slipka celebrates the Supreme Court decision on marriage equality outside the Supreme court on June 26, 2015.  (Photo by Corinne Segal)

Brigid Slipka, left, director of philanthropy for the ACLU, said the decision should be important to all people regardless of their sexuality. “We’re all people. It doesn’t matter how you identify, we should be treated equally,” she said. Photo by Corinne Segal

Joshua Denton stands outside the Supreme Court on June 26, 2015. (Photo by Corinne Segal)

Joshua Denton said he did not support same-sex marriage and believed in defining marriage as strictly between a man and a woman. Photo by Corinne Segal

Jamal Brown (right) celebrates the Supreme Court decision on marriage equality on June 26, 2015. (Photo by Corinne Segal)

White House Deputy Press Secretary Jamal Brown, right, celebrates the Supreme Court decision on marriage equality. Photo by Corinne Segal

Sophia Romeu (left) and Joe Goldman (right) celebrate the Supreme Court decision on marriage equality on June 26, 2015. (Photo by Corinne Segal)

Joe Goldman, right, who came to the court dressed as Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader-Ginsburg, said that she had always been a role model for him. Goldman came out as a gay man while he was living in Texas. “Knowing today that my gay friends in Texas can get married gives me shivers,” he said. His friend Sophia Romeu, left, said she was at the court to honor “everyone who has had the courage to fight for what they believe in.” (Photo by Corinne Segal)

A group celebrates the Supreme Court's decision on marriage equality on June 26, 2015. (Photo by Corinne Segal)

A group celebrates the Supreme Court’s decision on marriage equality. Photo by Corinne Segal

Joshua Dowling (left) and Sam Knode celebrate the Supreme Court decision on marriage equality on June 26, 2015. (Photo by Corinne Segal)

Joshua Dowling, left, and Sam Knode hug outside the Supreme Court. “It’s amazing to have gone from a child that was afraid to come out … to now being 24 and having the government say that my love matters equally under the law,” Dowling said. Photo by Corinne Segal

Karin Quimby celebrates the Supreme Court decision on marriage equality on June 26, 2015. (Photo by Corinne Segal)

Karin Quimby came out when she was 17 in 1984. “I never thought I’d see this day in my lifetime,” she said. Photo by Corinne Segal

Katherine Nicole Struck (holding sign) said she hoped the Supreme Court's marriage equality decision would be the first step in dismantling discrimination. (Photo by Corinne Segal)

Katherine Nicole Struck of Frederick, Maryland (holding sign), said she hoped the decision would be the first step in dismantling discrimination against LGBTQ people. Photo by Corinne Segal

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