Quentin Tarantino sues Gawker over leaked film script

BY Zachary Treu  January 27, 2014 at 6:48 PM EST

Photo by Georges Biard/Wikimedia Commons

Film director Quentin Tarantino filed a copyright lawsuit against blog network Gawker Media and others for “allegedly facilitating the dissemination of copies” of “The Hateful Eight,” an unproduced screenplay that was leaked to the public last week, according to Te Hollywood Reporter.

Shortly after news of the leak broke, Defamer, the Hollywood gossip section of Gawker Media’s flagship site, Gawker.com, posted plot details and a link to the 146-page script.

The sternly worded lawsuit, which was obtained by The Hollywood Reporter, accuses Gawker Media of “blatant copyright infringement.” It stresses that the blog post “brazenly encourages” viewers to illegally read the document.

“Gawker Media has made a business of predatory journalism, violating people’s rights to make a buck. This time they went too far. Rather than merely publishing a news story reporting that Plaintiff’s screenplay may have been circulating in Hollywood without his permission, Gawker Media crossed the journalistic line by promoting itself to the public as the first source to read the entire Screenplay illegally.”

The lawsuit also accuses a number of other defendants of copyright infringement, including AnonFiles.com, where the script was hosted.

“The Hateful Eight” is an ensemble Western film that Tarantino originally planned to shoot next winter. He gave the script to a small group of six people, but one of them leaked it. Tarantino was so upset that he vowed not to make the film next, he told Deadline last week:

“I can tell you, it’s not going to be the next thing I do. It’s my baby, and if the muse calls me later to do it, we’ll do it. I was thinking about the idea of maybe publishing it before I made it, but now that deal happens for sure, and I’m not doing it next.”

The lawsuit claims relief in the form of “an amount exceeding $1,000,000 to be determined at trial” from Gawker Media, AnonFiles.com and several unnamed defendants, along with other damages.

Gawker responded to the lawsuit’s claims Monday evening.

H/T Zachary Treu