Repealing Obamacare would leave 32 million more uninsured by 2026, report says

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Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT) speaks with reporters about the withdrawn Republican health care bill on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., July 18, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein - RTX3BYOF

Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT) speaks with reporters about the withdrawn Republican health care bill July 18 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. July 18, 2017. A new report says an additional 32 million people would be uninsured if lawmakers repeal Obamacare, as Senate leaders consider a vote next week on legislation getting rid of Obama’s law but not replacing it. Photo by REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein.

The Congressional Budget Office estimates that the Republican bill erasing but not replacing much of President Barack Obama’s health care law would mean an additional 32 million uninsured people by 2026.

The report from Congress’ nonpartisan budget analyst says the measure would cause average premiums for people buying their own health insurance to double by 2026.

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It also says that by that same year, three-fourths of Americans would live in regions without any insurers selling policies to individuals.

The report was released as Senate leaders consider a vote next week on legislation repealing Obama’s law, but not replacing it.

White House officials say they will continue to provide health care “cost sharing” subsidies that help cover deductibles and copayments for low-income consumers this month.

READ MORE: Americans want lawmakers to revise ‘Obamacare,’ not kill it, poll says

But White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders says the subsidies’ status is “undetermined beyond that.”

Sanders was speaking at a White House briefing Wednesday after President Donald Trump held a lunch with Senate Republicans trying to salvage their stalled “Obamacare” replacement health care bill.

Trump has repeatedly suggested withholding the money to try to force Democrats to negotiate with Republicans in Congress. But his administration has continued to make subsidy payments to insurers from month to month.

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