Reports: California reaches tentative deal to raise minimum wage to $15

BY  
Fast-food workers and supporters organized by the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) protest outside of a Burger King Worldwide Inc. restaurant in Los Angeles, California, U.S., on Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013. California lawmakers and unions reached a tentative deal on Saturday that would raise the state's minimum wage to $15 an hour. Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Fast-food workers and supporters organized by the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) protest outside of a Burger King Worldwide Inc. restaurant in Los Angeles, California, U.S., on Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013. California lawmakers and unions reached a tentative deal on Saturday that would raise the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour. Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

California lawmakers reportedly reached a deal on Saturday to raise the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2022.

The agreement, tentatively formed with some of California’s most powerful labor unions, would gradually raise the state’s minimum wage from $10 to $15 an hour over the next six years, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown is expected to make an official announcement about the proposal on Monday.

Similar proposals are being debated in New York state while the city of Seattle passed a law raising its minimum wage to $15 in 2014. California is currently one of only 11 states already requiring a $10 an hour minimum wage.

California State Sen. Mark Leno told the Associated Press the legislature would view the plan through a bill already under consideration; an initiative supported by unions to raise the minimum wage to $15 has reached approval for the California ballot later this year.

SEIU-United Healthcare Workers West Spokesperson Sean Wherley, whose outfit took part in the negotiations with the state, said the union would sustain their efforts on the ballot measure until a deal is officially formed.

“We want to be certain of what all this is,” he told the AP. “We are going ahead with it. If some agreement is signed into law, then our executive board would decide what to do. They would only make that decision after any agreement is signed into law.”

SHARE VIA TEXT