WikiLeaks Stays Visible, But Is Net Closing In?

BY Chris Amico  December 3, 2010 at 12:30 PM EDT

The cat-and-mouse game between WikiLeaks and its detractors continues.

The site found itself without a domain name after its registrar, EveryDNS shut down WikiLeaks.org Thursday night, saying attacks on the site were threatening other customers.

More specifically, the services were terminated for violation of the provision which states that “Member shall not interfere with another Member’s use and enjoyment of the Service or another entity’s use and enjoyment of similar services.” The interference at issues arises from the fact that wikileaks.org has become the target of multiple distributed denial of service (DDOS) attacks. These attacks have, and future attacks would, threaten the stability of the EveryDNS.net infrastructure, which enables access to almost 500,000 other websites.

The site reappeared on a new domain with a Swiss suffix: WikiLeaks.ch, and without a domain.

WikiLeaks lost the support of another site, Tableau Software, which had been hosting charts built using the controversial diplomatic cables released earlier this week. Tableau deleted those charts from its database, saying WikiLeaks did not have a right to post the cables. And it added this note:

> Our decision to remove the data from our servers came in response to a public request by Senator Joe Lieberman, who chairs the Senate Homeland Security Committee, when he called for organizations hosting WikiLeaks to terminate their relationship with the website.

Lieberman earlier cheered Amazon.com’s decision to drop WikiLeaks, and called for other companies to refuse service to the site. Amazon said in a statement it made the decision based on its own terms of service.

All of this attention may be just what WikiLeaks’ founder, Julian Assange, wants, as he implied in an online chat with the Guardian.

Since 2007 we have been deliberately placing some of our servers in jurisdictions that we suspected suffered a free speech deficit in order to separate rhetoric from reality. Amazon was one of these cases.

Here’s a round-up of some of the latest WikiLeaks coverage from around the Web: