Three occupiers surrender in Oregon as Bundy urges all to go home

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Inmates (left to right) Duane Leo Ehmer, Jason S. Patrick and Dylan Wade Anderson are seen in a combination of police jail booking photos released by the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office in Portland, Oregon on Jan. 28. Law enforcement was working on Thursday to convince remaining protesters in a month-long armed occupation of a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon to leave the site following calls from the group's leader to stand down and the death of a member. Photo by MCSO/Handout via Reuters

Inmates (left to right) Duane Leo Ehmer, Jason S. Patrick and Dylan Wade Anderson are seen in a combination of police jail booking photos released by the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office in Portland, Oregon on Jan. 28. Law enforcement was working on Thursday to convince remaining protesters in a month-long armed occupation of a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon to leave the site following calls from the group’s leader to stand down and the death of a member. Photo by MCSO/Handout via Reuters

Three more armed occupants of an Oregon wildlife refuge surrendered to authorities on Wednesday after their jailed leader Ammon Bundy urged the remaining militants to “go home.”

The arrests took place at a checkpoint law enforcement had set up outside the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge south of Burns in central Oregon.

The three arrested were Duane Leo Ehmer, 45, of Irrigon, Oregon; Dylan Wade Anderson, 34, of Provo, Utah; and Jason S. Patrick, 43, of Bonaire, Georgia, according to the FBI and Oregon State Police, the Associated Press reported.

Bundy wrote a statement that his attorney read in court: “Please stand down. Go home and hug your families. The fight is now in the courts.”

A U.S. flag covers a sign at the entrance of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge near Burns, Oregon on Jan. 3. Photo by Jim Urquhart/Reuters

A U.S. flag covers a sign at the entrance of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge near Burns, Oregon on Jan. 3. Photo by Jim Urquhart/Reuters

About a half-dozen occupiers still remained at the camp late Wednesday, according to the AP.

On Tuesday, Bundy and other occupiers were arrested in a traffic stop on a remote highway, which resulted in the deaths of one of the militants Robert Finicum.

People offered conflicting accounts of the death. One of Bundy’s followers said Finicum had charged an FBI agent, who shot him, but a member of Bundy’s family said he had done nothing to provoke the agents, the AP reported.

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