U.S. to Present Afghan Phase-Out Plan; Rangel Faces Ethics Panel

BY Francine Uenuma  November 15, 2010 at 8:18 AM EDT

The Obama administration will present other NATO members with a four-year plan to phase out U.S. troops in Afghanistan and transfer security responsibilities to Afghan forces, according to the New York Times. The plan will share some common elements of the U.S. strategy in Iraq, transferring control on a regional level and over time. The number of troops in Afghanistan has tripled since President Obama took office.

Rangel Set to Testify at Ethics Trial


In an impassioned speech this summer, Rangel declared to fellow House members, “I am not going away.”

Rep. Charles Rangel, D-N.Y., will stand before a House panel Monday to refute allegations that he broke congressional rules related to taxes, fundraising and property ownership. Rangel, who dismissed his team of lawyers in September, will speak in his own defense. The 80-year-old legislator was re-elected in the Nov. 2 midterm elections.

For more on Rangel, read The Morning Line.

Ireland Resists Bailout Pressure

Despite efforts by the European Central Bank to stabilize the euro, Ireland has said it is not in need of financial rescue. There are fears among members of the 16-nation euro currency zone that Ireland could follow in the footsteps up Greece, which neared bankruptcy earlier this year.

Suu Kyi Calls for Change in Myanmar

Myanmar's newly-released opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi waves to supporters as she arrives at the National League for Democracy (NLD) headquarters in Yangon on Nov. 15, 2010.
Myanmar’s newly-released opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi waves to supporters as she arrives at the National League for Democracy (NLD) headquarters in Yangon on Nov. 15, 2010.

Two days after being released from house arrest, Myanmar’s revered opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi reiterated her belief that democracy would eventually be possible in the military-ruled nation. She said she was willing to meet with the country’s generals, but expressed hope that there would be a peaceful end to the junta’s longstanding grip on power.

Number of North Korean refugees in South Korea passes 20,000

North Koren defectors have been trickling into the South for decades, but the number has drastically increased since 2007, according to South Korea’s Unification Ministry. About 10,000, or half the total, have come in the past three years. Most must find a way to pass through China, which has a repatriation agreement with North Korea.