Voices From Egypt: ‘What Do You Think of the Revolution Now?’

BY Ghada Mashamoun  September 14, 2011 at 1:40 PM EST

Gamalaat Abdelhamid
Age 51, Unemployed
From: Shubra, Cairo

“We have a saying in Egypt that says, ‘one hand by itself, does not clap.’ This means that, this is a group effort and we have to make it work. I believe this is true in all aspects of Egyptian society after the revolution. While I am an uneducated woman, I knew things weren’t going to change overnight. Almost eight months later and we are stuck in the same story and nothing has changed. Corruption is still rampant, at the state and local level. I am an older, single mother of two young men in their late 20s. I have more hope in Egypt than them. They are home, while I come and chant here every chance I get. This is not just a youth revolution like people keep saying. This is the people’s revolution.”

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Islam Shawgi Mohamed
Age 21, DJ at the Grand Café Cairo
From: Helwan,Cairo

“We thought that once everything took place and the regime fell apart, that things would change drastically. I think people thought that they will prosper economically and job-wise, and that of course never happened. The only positive thing that this revolution produced was that now we have our dignity. Now there is respect between people, and they even mind the way they address each other.”

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Mahmoud Mohammed Youssef
Age 52, Coffee Shopkeeper at the Khan El-Khalili Bazaar
From: Gamiliya-Cairo

“Nothing happened in the past seven months since the regime stepped down. There is still high unemployment, we sill don’t have health care, our wages are low and the mood is pessimistic. After all that hard work, the gas and transportation are more expensive than ever, food and especially bread is becoming more expensive.”

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Hamdy El Sohpaty
Age 42, owner of a clothing manufacturing company
From: Downtown Cairo, Egypt

“I am pretty sure like everyone else is saying here, nothing major has changed in Egypt. We are all like a broken record, saying the same things because this is really the case. However, things that have changed, like more freedom to speak, have not come easy. We have to keep chanting and organizing rallies for every single thing we want changed in the new Egypt. The main problem I think with this revolution as well, is not just the social and economic aspect, but the fact that it’s the same people, different day.”

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Ahmed Sobhi
Age 30, Owner of Marketing Consultancy
From: Nasr City, Cairo

“There are lots of things that need to change in Egypt and in due time, they will. There are a couple of speed bumps along the way that we, as Egyptians, need to make sure we take care of, some of which are: election transparency, the role of media and learning how to have real dialogue in post-revolutionary Egypt. I feel that the current regime is trying to position themselves as the only good option in Egypt. They are using the media in telling Egyptians that it is either their regime or an Islamist regime. This is simply not true, we have many political options that can lead Egypt. “

The NewsHour has a team in Egypt, reporting on unrest in Cairo and attitudes about 9/11. Stay tuned for more on the broadcast and online.