afghanistan

  • August 23, 2013  

    A military jury handed Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales the toughest sentence they could issue for his murder rampage that killed 16 Afghan civilians last year. Bales will serve life in prison without parole. Margaret Warner talks to Adam Ashton, who has been covering the trial for the News Tribute in Tacoma, Wash. Continue reading

  • August 1, 2013  

    In other news Thursday, Ariel Castro was sentenced to life in prison without parole plus 1,000 years for holding three women captive for more than a decade at his home in Cleveland, Ohio. Also, Egypt’s interior ministry offered "safe passage" to thousands of Morsi supporters if they ended their protests. Continue reading

  • July 4, 2013  

    Margaret Warner talks to former Reagan administration official Michael Pillsbury and The Nation’s Robert Dreyfuss on what past endeavors by the United States to offer military aid to rebel movements can teach government officials today about providing weapons to the Syrian opposition. Continue reading

  • June 20, 2013  

    In other news Thursday, the U.S. House of Representatives failed to pass a five-year, half-trillion dollar farm bill. The bill would have cut food stamps by $2 billion annually. Also, Afghan President Hamid Karzai has changed his mind and says he will participate in peace talks with the U.S. and the Taliban. Continue reading

  • June 19, 2013  

    A day after an announcement that the Afghan government would open negotiations with the Taliban, President Hamid Karzai reversed that decision, raising objections including the Taliban’s use of its formal name at its new office in Qatar. Karzai also suspended talks with the U.S. over security conditions. Jeffrey Brown reports. Continue reading

  • June 19, 2013  

    A day after a breakthrough agreement on holding direct talks, Afghan President Hamid Karzai backed away from announced negotiations with the U.S. and the Taliban. Jeffrey Brown talks with The New York Times’ Rob Nordland, from Doha, Qatar, for more detail on the decision and possible next moves. Continue reading

  • June 18, 2013   BY Tom LeGro 

    For centuries, Pashtun women have traded stories, feelings and life wisdom in the form of two-line oral poems called landays. Eliza Griswold, a journalist and poet herself, traveled to Afghanistan to learn more about daily life there through the modern exchange of poetry. Jeffrey Brown takes a closer look at Griswold’s project.
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  • June 18, 2013   BY Meredith P. Garretson  

    Journalist and poet Eliza Griswold set out to document Afghan life through the prism of oral folk poems shared mostly among Pashtun women. Seamus Murphy, the London-based photographer and filmmaker who worked with Griswold on the landay project, has been covering events in Afghanistan for 20 years. He narrates a slideshow of some of his favorite images.
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  • June 18, 2013   BY Mary Jo Brooks  

    Journalist and poet Eliza Griswold set out to document Afghan life through the prism of oral folk poems shared mostly among Pashtun women. Seamus Murphy, the London-based photographer and filmmaker who worked with Griswold on the landay project, narrates a slideshow of some of his favorite images.
    Continue reading

  • June 18, 2013  

    As Afghan forces took control of their country’s security, the Taliban agreed to join the U.S. and Afghanistan for negotiations. Gwen Ifill talks to former Defense Department official David Sedney, retired Col. David Lamm of the National Defense University and Pamela Constable of The Washington Post about this turning point. Continue reading