africa

  • May 9, 2012   BY Larisa Epatko  

    Disputes along the border of Sudan and newly independent South Sudan blow hot and cold. Last month, fighting between the northern and southern armies over Sudan’s Heglig oil fields took the conflict to a new high. Although the battles there have stopped for now, the danger still exists for people who have fled the violence and are hiding in caves in the Nuba Mountains. Continue reading

  • April 26, 2012  

    Former Liberian President Charles Taylor’s guilty verdict Thursday was the first time an international court has convicted a head of state since the Nuremberg trials. Jeffrey Brown and Eric Stover of the University of California, Berkeley discuss the conviction and the potential legal implications for other cases. Continue reading

  • April 25, 2012  

    Since 1980, Liberia has tackled a cycle of civil war, claiming over 200,000 lives while developing an impossible water crisis. In partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, correspondent Steve Sapienza and two local journalists unearth why the government and aid agencies can’t crack the country’s water problems. Continue reading

  • April 11, 2012  

    Part of a partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, special correspondent Steve Sapienza reports from the West African nation of Ivory Coast and explains how committees set up to maintain access to water are helping bring together communities divided along ethnic lines and plagued by the unrest of a civil war. Continue reading

  • April 10, 2012  

    Ray Suarez speaks with authors Craig Timberg and Daniel Halperin about how “shadows of colonialism” hang over the spread of HIV from Africa. The topic is explored in their book “Tinderbox: How the West Sparked the AIDS Epidemic and How the World Can Finally Overcome it.” Continue reading

  • April 4, 2012  

    After witnessing the consequences of power outages in Nigeria’s health facilities, obstetrician Dr. Laura Stachel came up with a solution: a suitcase containing elements to produce and store solar energy. Spencer Michels reports on the life-saving device that aims to reduce maternal mortality rates in the developing world. Continue reading

  • March 14, 2012   BY Larisa Epatko  

    With violence putting people in the Nuba Mountains region of Sudan in peril, actor and human rights activist George Clooney said Wednesday in an interview with the NewsHour’s Judy Woodruff that it was only right to bring attention to the area. Continue reading

  • March 7, 2012  

    The Democratic Republic of Congo is the worst place on earth to be a woman, according to the United Nations. Regional war and rape leave an estimated 1,000 or more women assaulted every day. One organization, HEAL Africa, helps women manage their traumatic injuries holistically. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports. Continue reading

  • February 28, 2012  

    A controversial resettlement program in Ethiopia is the latest battleground in the global race to secure prized farmland and water. Correspondent Cassandra Herrman reports as part of the Food for 9 Billion series, a NewsHour partnership with the Center for Investigative Reporting, Homelands Productions and Marketplace. Continue reading

  • February 27, 2012   BY Larisa Epatko  

    Senegal, a West African nation reputed as being one of the continent’s most stable democracies, held presidential elections Sunday despite earlier violent protests by those angry the incumbent is seeking a third term. Continue reading