Center for Investigative Reporting

  • johndoe2
    October 5, 2015  

    There are more than 10,000 bodies — Jane and John Does — waiting for identification in city morgues and cemeteries in the U.S. With no national law requiring agencies share information on missing people and unknown bodies, many families are left in the dark about their loved ones’ fates. Michael Schiller of Reveal for the Center for Investigative Reporting has the story. Continue reading

  • meat
    September 13, 2014  

    China consumes half of the world’s pork. And the country’s growing middle class — bigger than the population of the United States — wants more meat. Nathan Halverson of The Center for Investigative Reporting looks at how China plans to meet that demand. Continue reading

  • gibill2
    July 7, 2014  

    Veterans can receive the full cost of a college education under the GI Bill, but recently funds from the bill have flowed mostly to for-profit schools, even though veterans’ prospects are often not appreciably better after attending them. Aaron Glantz of the Center for Investigative Reporting explores the growing scrutiny on the destination of this federal funding. Continue reading

  • Screenshot 2014-04-10 11.11.01
    April 26, 2014  

    A report from the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED delves into a wide-scale surveillance system being developed for police forces. How can the trade off between safety and privacy be negotiated as technology gets more and more sophisticated? Continue reading

  • surveillance
    April 25, 2014  

    The FBI’s Next Generation Identification program, officially launching this summer, will give police access to more data than ever before by way of biometrics—biological marks from facial scans and palm prints—to identify suspects. Some opponents worry this growing web of security will give police too much personal information without a warrant. The Center for Investigative Reporting’s Amanda Pike reports. Continue reading

  • jailedforlove
    April 4, 2014  

    Despite some progress in the treatment of Afghan women since the 2001 fall of the Taliban, there are thousands of females accused of so-called moral crimes who have been jailed or have fled to safe houses in fear of their lives. The Center for Investigative Reporting teams up with filmmaker Zohreh Soleimani, who has directed a documentary, “To Kill a Sparrow,” that sheds light on their oppression. Continue reading

  • Rhonda Marshall, 58, waves to visitors outside the Hacienda public housing complex. She’s been living on the high-rise’s first floor for years and has watched the building deteriorate. She says sees cracks in the walls running from the sixth floor to the ground and smells mold in the hallways and stairwells. Photo by Lacy Atkins/San Francisco Chronicle

    Every year, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development compiles a list of the worst of the worst public housing agencies across the nation. The city of Richmond, Calif., across the bay from San Francisco and home to Chevron Oil Company, has been on that list since 2009. Some of the poorest, oldest and most vulnerable people in the Bay area live there in squalor and fear due to mismanagement and neglect at the hands of the city’s housing agency. This story was produced in partnership with The Center for Investigative Reporting and the San Francisco Chronicle. Continue reading

  • November 22, 2012  

    As China’s economy has grown, the way of life for many Chinese has changed, especially diet. Per capita, consumption of meat has quadrupled in China over the last 30 years. PRI’s The World correspondent Mary Kay Magistad reports on how China is dealing with this growing demand. Continue reading

  • November 13, 2012  

    As China’s economy has grown, the way of life for many Chinese has changed, especially diet. Per capita, consumption of meat has quadrupled in China over the last 30 years. PRI’s The World correspondent Mary Kay Magistad reports on how China is dealing with this growing demand. Continue reading

  • June 10, 2011  

    Thousands of Iranians took to the streets in 2009 as part of the Green Movement to protest a disputed presidential election. The government crackdown that followed included some women being imprisoned, tortured and raped. This report shares some of their stories. It is a co-production with The Center for Investigative Reporting. Continue reading