civil rights

  • Rally Held in Ferguson Over Police Killing Of Michael Brown
    March 3, 2015  

    A new report by the Department of Justice says that police in Ferguson, Missouri, have shown a pattern of racial bias and civil rights abuses. The findings come after a months-long investigation following the fatal shooting of teenager Michael Brown. Gwen Ifill gets reaction from Justin Hansford of Saint Louis University School of Law and Paul Butler of Georgetown University Law Center. Continue reading

  • An audio recording of a speech given by Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was discovered at UCLA and posted online this week. Credit: Stephen Somerstein/Getty Images
    January 18, 2015   BY  

    An audio recording of a speech given by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in the 1960s, long thought to be lost in time, was made available to the masses this week online.
    Continue reading

  • duvernay
    January 8, 2015  

    The story of the seminal 1965 Alabama civil rights protests is being retold in the historical drama “Selma,” bringing to life the heroism of the activists and the brutality of the resistance. Gwen Ifill talks to director Ava DuVernay about contention over historical discrepancies and why no one has ever attempted to make a feature film about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. before. Continue reading

  • grads
    January 7, 2015   BY  

    For the first time this year, non-white children make up a larger portion of the country’s public school students than white children. Within that growing racial diversity is an increasing linguistic diversity. There are about 5 million public school students who are not proficient English speakers. Since 2004, 19 states have seen the number of these students enrolled in public schools grow more than 40 percent, according to the Department of Education. Continue reading

  • American Civil Rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (1929 - 1968) and his wife Coretta Scott King (1927 - 2006) (center, arm in arm) lead others during on the Selma to Montgomery marches held in support of voter rights, Alabama, late March, 1965. Among those with them are Reverend Ralph Abernathy (1926 - 1990) (at left, facing camera), and Pulitzer-Prize winning political scientist and diplomat Ralph Bunche (1904 - 1971) (front row, third left with glasses) whose his wife, Ruth (nee Harris, 1906 - 1988), holds his arm. (Photo by Robert Abbott Sengstacke/Getty Images)
    December 12, 2014   BY  

    There is a shock of recognition in the scenes that begin and end “Selma,” the elegiac new work by filmmaker Ava DuVernay. Even if you know only a little about your history, the events surrounding the 1965 Selma to Montgomery, Alabama March will seem familiar. Continue reading

  • Crowd surrounds the police car in Sproul Plaza holding student activist Jack Weinberg at the University of California, Berkeley on Oct. 1, 1964. Photo courtesy  U.C. Berkeley, Bancroft Library
    October 16, 2014   BY  

    Fifty years ago this month, long before the Vietnam War, students on the U.C. Berkeley campus ignited protests over a ban on political activity — a student movement that would morph into the huge, confrontational demonstrations of the early 1970s and beyond. Continue reading

  • 50 YEARS ON monitor lady bird johnson whistle stop
    October 6, 2014  

    Fifty years ago, in October 1964, less than a month before the presidential elections, Lady Bird Johnson boarded a train in Washington to stump through eight Southern states — a gamble to help win back disaffected voters after the passage of the Civil Rights Act. Judy Woodruff explores a lesser-known part of the legislation’s history with a look at the first lady’s influential whistle-stop tour. Continue reading

  • A White House official has announced that U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder will resign Thursday. Photo by Alex Wong and Getty Images
    September 25, 2014  

    After six years as head of the Department of Justice, Eric Holder, the nation’s first African-American attorney general, will be stepping down. Holder has focused on major civil liberties issues, but has also been a lightning rod for partisan criticism. Gwen Ifill assesses Holder’s tenure with Tony West, the former associate attorney general, and Hans von Spakovsky of the Heritage Foundation. Continue reading

  • The Supreme Court begins a new term on Monday, Oct. 6. Among the cases justices will hear is one on redistricting in Alabama. Credit: Getty Images.
    September 6, 2014   BY  

    The Supreme Court could decide as early as this month whether to take up yet another case challenging so-called “disparate impact” lawsuits. In disparate impact cases, plaintiffs rely on statistics to show that seemingly neutral housing or lending practices can disproportionately harm racial minorities, even if there is no proof of intent to discriminate. The theory has been used for years to show bias in employment cases, but Texas officials are urging the justices to find that it doesn’t apply in housing discrimination cases. Continue reading

  • Police stand watch as demonstrators protest the shooting death of teenager Michael Brown, who was shot and killed by a Ferguson police officer last month. The Justice Department launched a civil rights investigation into the police practices in the St. Louis suburb. Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images
    September 4, 2014   BY  

    WASHINGTON — The Justice Department plans to open a wide-ranging civil rights investigation into the practices of the Ferguson, Missouri, Police Department following the shooting last month of an unarmed black 18-year-old by a white police officer in the St. Louis suburb, a person briefed on the matter said Wednesday night.

    The person said the investigation could be announced as early as Thursday afternoon. Missouri officials were notified Wednesday of the probe. Continue reading