civil rights

  • Outrage In Missouri Town After Police Shooting Of 18-Yr-Old Man
    August 12, 2014  

    For a second night, protests boiled over into violence in Ferguson, Missouri, after the fatal police shooting of an unarmed African-American teenager on Saturday. In a statement, President Obama said pain over the killing should be expressed in a way “that heals, not in a way that wounds.” For a closer look at the unrest, Judy Woodruff talks to Jim Salter of the Associated Press. Continue reading

  • freedom3
    August 8, 2014  

    During the long, hot Freedom Summer of 1964, young volunteers faced threats and violence in Mississippi to register voters and build a network of enrichment schools to teach young African-Americans about themselves and their history. Fifty years later, nearly 200 chapters are carrying on the mission for a new generation. Gwen Ifill reports. Continue reading

  • KENYA-CHINA-CONSTRUCTION
    August 5, 2014  

    President Obama announced billions of dollars in new public and private investment in Africa’s rapidly growing markets — on everything from construction to banking to clean energy infrastructure — at the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit in Washington. Gwen Ifill talks to Chris Fomunyoh of the National Democratic Institute and Torek Farhadi International Trade Centre about the growing partnership. Continue reading

  • africa2
    August 4, 2014  

    Will the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit offer opportunities for change beyond trade? Judy Woodruff talks to Nicole Lee, former president of policy organization TransAfrica, about the human rights issues that will affect the ability of some countries to grow and become more prosperous. Continue reading

  • A new report observes an increase in laws that criminalize homelessness in U.S. cities. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
    July 24, 2014   BY  

    A new report released last week by the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty observed an increase in laws targeting the homeless, such as bans on loitering, sitting and sleeping in public. Join us in a Twitter chat on the ethics and effectiveness of such laws, 1-2 p.m. EDT Thursday, July 24. Continue reading

  • Photo by Tetra Images/Brand X Pictures via Getty Images. related words: woman, business, businesswoman, job, jobs, office, employee, work, pregnant, mother
    July 15, 2014   BY  

    WASHINGTON — For the first time in 30 years, the federal government is issuing new guidelines designed to protect pregnant workers from on-the-job discrimination. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) update makes it clear that any form of workplace discrimination … Continue reading

  • central park 5 MONITOR
    June 20, 2014  

    New York City will pay $40 million to five black and Latino men who 25 years ago were wrongly convicted of raping and beating a woman in Central Park. Their conviction was vacated in 2002, but it took until now to close the book on the decade-long civil rights lawsuit. Jeffrey Brown talks to Craig Steven Wilder of Massachusetts Institute of Technology for more on the legacy of the infamous crime. Continue reading

  • President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1964 Civil Rights Act as Martin Luther King, Jr. and others look on. East Room, White House, Washington, D.C. Photo by Cecil Stoughton
    June 12, 2014   BY  

    Fifty years ago this July, President Lyndon B. Johnson enacted the Civil Rights Act. Do you remember its passage? Continue reading

  • Photo by Flickr user Ludovic Bertron
    May 30, 2014   BY  

    A baker in a suburb of Denver must make wedding cakes for same-sex couples despite his religious objections, the Colorado Civil Rights Commission ruled Friday.

    Jack Phillips, owner of the Masterpiece Cakeshop in Lakewood, Colorado, refused to make a wedding cake for gay couple Dave Mullins and Charlie Craig in July 2012. Phillips, a devout Christian, cited religious objections in his refusal, which the commission said were overruled by Colorado’s anti-discrimination laws that prevents businesses from refusing service due to customer sexual orientation. Continue reading

  • mayaangelou_image1
    May 28, 2014  

    Drawing on a childhood of abuse and segregation, writer and author Maya Angelou moved the nation. Works such as her 1978 poem, “And Still I Rise,” explored the effects of racism and sexism on personal identity, with a voice that married oral and written literary traditions. Jeffrey Brown discusses with Elizabeth Alexander of Yale University why the voice of Angelou resonates so profoundly. Continue reading