debt crisis

  • Former Greek prime minister and leader of leftist Syriza party Alexis Tsipras waves to supporters after winning the general election in Athens, Greece, September 20, 2015. Greek voters returned Tsipras to power with a strong election victory on Sunday, ensuring the charismatic leftist remains Greece's dominant political figure despite caving in to European demands for a bailout he once opposed. REUTERS/Michalis Karagiannis - RTS21SF
    September 21, 2015  

    Alexis Tsipras was sworn in as Greece’s prime minister a month after he had resigned as the country’s leader. His leftist Syriza party won enough parliamentary seats in a snap election to form a coalition government. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant gets reaction in crisis-weary Greece. Continue reading

  • Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras is received by Greece's President Prokopis Pavlopoulios (unseen) in Athens, Greece, August 20, 2015. Tsipras resigned on Thursday, hoping to strengthen his hold on power in snap elections after seven months in office in which he fought Greece's creditors for a better bailout deal but had to cave in.   REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis - RTX1OZMD
    August 20, 2015  

    Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras announced he is resigning after tough bailout negotiations, paving the way for snap elections. Judy Woodruff speaks to John Psaropoulos, a blogger for Continue reading

  • A woman carries bags while walking in a commercial area with stores either closed or offered for sale in San Juan, Puerto Rico, July 31, 2015. Puerto Rico will miss a payment on debt due August 1, the governor's chief of staff said on Friday, an event that will be considered a default by investors as the commonwealth lurches towards what could be one of the largest U.S. municipal debt restructurings in history. The island faces a number of debt payments that day but had signaled in recent weeks that it may miss the $58 million payment on Public Finance Corporation (PFC) bonds. REUTERS/Alvin Baez  - RTX1MMK6
    August 13, 2015  

    New austerity measures are imposing more economic pain on U.S. territory Puerto Rico, which already has a poverty rate almost double that of America’s poorest state. In turn, many are deciding to leave the island for better opportunity and pay in the states. Special correspondent Chris Bury reports. Continue reading

  • A man walks past pictures of ancient coins in central Athens, Greece, July 13, 2015.  Euro zone leaders agreed on a roadmap to a possible third bailout for near-bankrupt Greece on Monday, but Athens must enact key reforms this week before they will start talks on a financial rescue to keep it in the European currency area. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier  - RTX1K69J
    July 13, 2015  

    Greece struck a debt deal after a long night of negotiations with European creditors. According to the preliminary deal, the nearly bankrupt country will receive a $95 billion bailout over three years, and be subject to tough austerity measures. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports from Greece and Judy Woodruff gets reaction from Eswar Prasad of Cornell University. Continue reading

  • A woman walks past a closed restaurant in Ponce, on Puerto Rico's southern coast, February 5, 2014. Standard & Poor's cut Puerto Rico's credit rating to junk status, in the latest blow to an economy that has been battling chronic recession, population decline and a perennial budget shortfall that has left it with $70 billion in debt. REUTERS/Alvin Baez (PUERTO RICO - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS) - RTX189FA
    July 11, 2015  

    Puerto Rico’s financial crisis has been well-documented over the last few weeks, but a new report in the Washington Post sheds light on how Congress may have played a role in the fiscal troubles being felt in the U.S. commonwealth. Michael Fletcher of the Washington Post joins Hari Sreenivasan from Baltimore with the latest. Continue reading

  • Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras delivers his speech as he attends a parliamentary session in Athens, Greece, July 10, 2015. Tsipras appealed to his party's lawmakers on Friday to back a tough reforms package after abruptly offering last-minute concessions to try to save the country from financial meltdown.           REUTERS/Christian Hartmann  - RTX1JXVY
    July 10, 2015  

    Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras is now offering concessions to creditors, such as a higher sales tax and pension changes, in hopes of winning a new bailout worth nearly $60 billion. Jonathan Rugman of Independent Television News reports on the response to the controversial package in Greece. Continue reading

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    July 8, 2015  

    In our news wrap Wednesday, Microsoft announced it is cutting an additional 7,800 jobs in the company’s struggling phone business, after cutting 18,000 jobs in that sector as part of restructuring. Also, Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras addressed the European Parliament in France, offering a new financial bailout proposal. Continue reading

  • A Greek flag flies past a statue depicting the European unity outside the European Parliament ahead of a euro zone leaders summit on Greece in Brussels, Belgium, July 6, 2015. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir - RTX1J9F1
    July 6, 2015  

    On Sunday, Greek voters voiced a resounding “no” to more austerity cuts. But what happens if Greek proposals fail to impress at an emergency summit of eurozone leaders in Brussels? Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports. Continue reading

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    July 6, 2015  

    What’s next for Greece after voters rejected a bailout referendum Sunday? Gwen Ifill speaks to Greek Ambassador Christos Panagopoulos about the path ahead for his nation and the potential global consequences of not reaching a compromise with lenders. Continue reading

  • Newly-appointed Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos reacts during a handover ceremony in Athens, Greece July 6, 2015. Greece's top negotiator in aid talks with creditors, Euclid Tsakalotos, was sworn in as finance minister on Monday after the resignation of Yanis Varoufakis.  REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis - RTX1JAIR
    July 6, 2015  

    After Sunday’s ‘no’ vote in Greece, all sides are uncertain about what will happen next. Stephan Richter of The Globalist and Paul Krugman of The New York Times offer different perspectives on what the vote means for Greece’s future. Continue reading

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