democracy

  • November 19, 2012  

    For nearly 50 years, Myanmar was ruled by military dictatorship. But the country’s leadership has made a rapid about-face in the last two years, pressing sweeping reforms transitioning towards democracy, reducing corruption and increasing transparency. Ray Suarez reports on President Obama’s historic trip to the country. Continue reading

  • November 19, 2012  

    President Obama’s trip is the first time that a U.S. president has visited Myanmar. Ray Suarez talks to retired foreign service officer Priscilla Clapp and Human Rights Watch’s Tom Malinowski for analysis on whether reforms are aggressive enough to establish a strong democracy and reduce ethnic conflict in Myanmar. Continue reading

  • October 12, 2012  

    Winner of the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize, the European Union was created for its member nations to deal with political, diplomatic and economic problems together. Ray Suarez talks to E.U. Ambassador to the U.S. Joao Vale de Almeida, who says as Europe’s economic woes increase, European Union ties will likely deepen, not break. Continue reading

  • September 19, 2012  

    Though significant steps have been taken, tensions remain between reform and hardline Burmese politicians. Margaret Warner talks to U.S. Campaign for Burma’s Jennifer Quigley and Open Society Foundation’s Maureen Aung-Thwin for more on what the U.S. role should be in encouraging Myanmar’s path to greater democracy. Continue reading

  • July 30, 2012  

    After the military dictatorship fell in the 1980s, Fernando Henrique Cardoso led efforts to combat high inflation and build Brazil’s economy into one of the fastest growing in the world. Jeffrey Brown talks to former Brazilian president Cardoso about his presidency and scholarship. Continue reading

  • July 16, 2012  

    What techniques do modern-day dictators use to control protestors? Hari Sreenivasan and Slate editor William Dobson discuss Dobson’s new book, “The Dictator’s Learning Curve,” a portrait of how today’s dictators are confronting and controlling democracy activists. Continue reading

  • June 4, 2012  

    Demonstrators protested for a third consecutive day Monday in Cairo’s Tahrir Square after former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak was sentenced to life in prison over the weekend. Gwen Ifill reports on the uprising, just weeks after the country’s first democratic presidential election. Continue reading

  • June 4, 2012  

    On Saturday, longtime Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak was sentenced to life in prison for his role in not stopping the killing of protesters during the Arab Spring. Also, his associates and sons were found not guilty. Gwen Ifill speaks with McClatchy Newspapers’ Nancy Youssef about the intense demonstrations in Tahrir Square. Continue reading

  • April 3, 2012  

    Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood had initially pledged not to field a candidate for president. But last Saturday, the country’s oldest Islamic movement nominated Deputy Chairman Khairat el-Shater to run in the May 23-24 election. Margaret Warner reports on the announcement’s subsequent unease. Continue reading

  • March 30, 2012  

    Ahead of a landmark election in Myanmar, special correspondent Kira Kay and producer Jason Maloney report on the notoriously repressive country’s first steps toward greater freedoms for the press and political activism with a look at the inner workings and goals of the Eleven Media Group’s newsroom. Continue reading