doubly segregated

  • Students in an integrated classroom attend Anacostia High School in Washington, D.C., in 1957. Photo by Warren K. Leffler, Courtesy Library of Congress
    May 16, 2014   BY Kyla Calvert 

    When 17-year-old Jessica Black walks to school, the neighbors she sees mirror her city’s diversity. There are white, Asian, black and interracial families living on her block in Washington, D.C. But at Calvin Coolidge High School, where she is a senior this year, the tableau is different. Jessica has no Asian or white classmates, and the school struggles to attract families with other academic options. Just four miles away, Woodrow Wilson High School is the kind of multiracial campus the Brown decision made possible. Continue reading