Egypt

  • March 16, 2011  

    In other news Wednesday, the Tokyo stock market rebounded, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced new national limits on mercury pollution from coal-fired power plants. Continue reading

  • March 14, 2011  

    Following a month of protests challenging the power of Bahrain’s ruling monarchy, Saudi Arabia and other Gulf states sent at least 1,000 troops into the neighboring nation on Monday. Margaret Warner talks to Kenneth Pollack of the Brookings Institution about the move and Saudi efforts to quell revolutions in the Gulf. Continue reading

  • March 10, 2011   BY Larisa Epatko  

    Following Egypt’s revolution that brought down former president Hosni Mubarak a month ago, Egyptians are cautiously optimistic about the movement toward democracy, but sporadic violence continues to hamper the process, reports Jon Jensen, GlobalPost’s correspondent in Cairo. Continue reading

  • March 9, 2011  

    In other news Wednesday, at least 13 people were killed and 140 wounded in new sectarian violence in Egypt as Muslims attacked Christian demonstrators. The Christians were protesting the burning of a church. Also, a suicide bomber killed at least 36 people at a funeral in northwest Pakistan. Continue reading

  • March 9, 2011   BY Paul Solman  

    With all the strife over public-sector unions, including irate e-mails in response to our pension coverage on the program, we thought we’d lighten the mood by sharing some recent political cartoons.

  • March 4, 2011  

    In other news Friday, major new protests were held across much of the Middle East, including Egypt, Iraq and the Arabian Peninsula. Iraq’s government even imposed a vehicle ban, trying to limit turnout. Also, several thousand people protested in Turkey over the arrests of eight journalists. Continue reading

  • February 25, 2011  

    In other news Friday, protests flared across the Arab world with some demonstrations resulting in violence. Iraqis demanding better government services clashed with security forces, and Cairo’s Tahrir Square was filled with protesters urging democratic reforms. Protests also continued in Bahrain and Yemen. Continue reading

  • February 25, 2011   BY Paul Solman  

    Are there any economic explanations for the world running riot, especially in North Africa? Maybe, says investment adviser Ed Yardeni, an otherwise pretty consistently conservative economist. He cites distinguished Brandeis University historian David Hackett Fischer and Fischer’s 1996 book, “The … Continue reading

  • February 25, 2011   BY Paul Solman  

    Is there an economic explanation for the world running riot, especially in North Africa? Maybe, says investment advisor Ed Yardeni, an otherwise pretty consistently conservative economist. He cites distinguished Brandeis University, historian David Hackett Fischer and Fischer’s 1996 book, “The … Continue reading

  • February 22, 2011  

    The Muslim Brotherhood, long banned in Egypt and framed by ousted President Mubarak as an extremist group, is shaping its role in post-Mubarak Egypt. The NewsHour has an excerpt of a segment that airs Tuesday night on Frontline, and then Jeffrey Brown talks with GlobalPost’s Charles Sennott, who reported the story. Continue reading