essays

  • August 23, 2004  

    Essayist Roger Rosenblatt suggests that Americans like to loose themselves in detective novels because it romanticizes these characters’ quest for justice. Continue reading

  • August 6, 2004  

    Essayist Roger Rosenblatt considers how people live in the present and the past at the same time. Continue reading

  • July 12, 2004  

    Clarence Page argues the mere act of judgment is regarded as hatred in modern-day street lingo. Page then asks, if anyone who offers a critique of another now can be called full-blown hater, is there any language left to identify the true bigots? Continue reading

  • July 6, 2004  

    Essayist Richard Rodriguez argues that some American politicians and religious leaders have successfully shortened the separation between the political assembly and the pulpit and allowed America to see itself as the Judeo-Christian nation against which Osama bin Laden said he is fighting a religious war. Continue reading

  • June 29, 2004  

    Essayist Roger Rosenblatt reflects on the release of photographs of inmate abuse at the Abu Ghraib prison in Baghdad and says that seeing is not always the only element in believing. Continue reading

  • June 18, 2004  

    As Father’s Day approaches, essayist Anne Taylor Fleming says modern male heroes are not only the ones who fulfill the traditional stereotype of muscled masculinity. Continue reading

  • May 31, 2004  

    Essayist Anne Taylor Fleming reflects on celebrating Memorial Day in a time of war. Continue reading

  • May 21, 2004  

    Essayist Anne Taylor Fleming reflects on how she and other women of the baby-boomer generation are learning from their parents about how to approach a less lonesome model for facing age in their senior years. Continue reading

  • May 14, 2004  

    Essayist Roger Rosenblatt remembers monologist Spalding Gray, who pioneered the one-man act, but who — even while exposing himself to others — remained alone on stage. Continue reading

  • May 11, 2004  

    Essayist Clarence Page reflects on the 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education decision on desegregation, but he insists modern-day African-Americans have only as much integration as they can afford. Continue reading