European Union

  • October 17, 2016  

    In our news wrap Monday, government forces in Afghanistan are reporting progress against Taliban forces in a key southern city. Also, the city of Aleppo may get a brief respite this week, after Russia announced an eight-hour “humanitarian pause.” But Russian and Syrian airstrikes have continued, while European Union leaders meeting in Luxembourg condemned Russia’s air campaign. Continue reading

  • October 4, 2016  

    In our news wrap Tuesday, the path is now clear for the Paris climate change accord to take effect. It got backing from enough countries to account for 55 percent of global emissions. Also, there’s a new surge in the flow of migrants traveling from Libya to Italy. The Italian Coast Guard reports that 6,000 people were rescued on Monday. Continue reading

  • September 13, 2016  

    It seemed like a rare positive story about the migrant crisis: African refugees, relocated to Sardinia from their war-torn countries, providing for themselves by farming. But when the NewsHour arrived at the farm, no workers were there. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant’s ensuing investigation was winding and, at times, hostile. Were there ever any farmers, or was something else going on? Continue reading

  • August 30, 2016  

    In our news wrap Tuesday, polls opened in several high-profile primaries. In Florida, Sen. Marco Rubio (R) appears poised to maintain his seat, while Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D) faces stiff competition from Tim Canova. In Arizona, Sen. John McCain (R) is expected to weather a tea-party challenge. Also, the Islamic State announced that leader Abu Muhammad Al-Adnani was killed in Syria. Continue reading

  • August 30, 2016  

    After uncovering an illegal deal, the European Union ruled that Apple pay over $14.5 billion in back taxes to Ireland. The EU’s antitrust regulator found that the country and the tech giant had made an agreement that allowed Apple to pay less than 1 percent in corporate tax for over a decade. Apple plans to appeal the decision. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with EU Commissioner Margrethe Vestager. Continue reading

  • August 17, 2016  

    The world was shocked when, in June, the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union. Many believe the severance will negatively affect Britain’s economy, but the fishing industry expects benefits — including increased profitability, poverty relief and elimination of what some fishermen see as harmful restrictions. From southwest England, special correspondent Jennifer Glasse has the story. Continue reading

  • August 8, 2016   BY  

    There are and will be significant headwinds for this or any future UK government trying to negotiate its way out of the European Union. Continue reading

  • July 11, 2016  

    Russia’s game-changing moves in the Ukraine and new aggressive posture against NATO were the focus of a NewsHour series last week looking at the fault lines between Moscow and the West. Over the weekend, President Barack Obama and other leaders of the alliance met in Poland. John Yang learns more from former State Department official Esther Brimmer.
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  • July 7, 2016  

    The pound and European markets took big hits when the United Kingdom voted to leave the EU. Economics correspondent Paul Solman talks to Mervyn King, the former head of the Bank of England and the author of “The End of Alchemy,” who offers a longer view — and a less alarmed one — about what Brexit means for global banking and financial stability. Continue reading

  • June 28, 2016  

    In British households and across the United Kingdom, the question of whether the nation should break away from the European Union split along one clear dividing line. In general, older voters voted to leave, while younger voters wanted to remain. Hari Sreenivasan talks to people on both sides of the generation gap about the factors that influenced their choices and how they see the outcome.
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