Fronteras

  • El Salvador police officers Daniel Campos and Raul Garcia check to see if a man's shotgun is legally registered. Photo by Jude Joffe-Block
    October 9, 2014   BY Jude Joffe-Block, Fronteras 

    On a recent day, two community police officers patrolled a neighborhood on the outskirts of the city of Santa Ana on foot. With training and assistance from the U.S. State Department, El Salvador is trying to use a new philosophy of crime prevention. Continue reading

  • The bridge that divides gang territory in José hometown. Photo by Lady Conde/Fronteras Desk
    October 3, 2014   BY Jude Joffe-Block, Fronteras 

    American immigration courts are gearing up to decide the fate of tens of thousands of children from Central America who came to the United States border in recent months. Meanwhile, Mexico has been cracking down on these migrants en route north, and is already sending children back to their home countries. In the state of La Paz, El Salvador, one boy returns to his hometown that has been ravaged by gang violence. Continue reading

  • A mother and her children leave a deportation processing center after returning to El Salvador. Photo by Kate Sheehy/Fronteras Desk
    September 25, 2014   BY Kate Sheehy, Fronteras 

    SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador — The tiny nation of El Salvador is scrambling to receive thousands of children deported from Mexico back to their home country. In coming months, more children are anticipated to arrive, this time deported from the United States. The country is under pressure from not only the U.S. and Mexico to keep these kids home, but also from its own people to provide protection for its children. The Salvadoran government lacks the resources and infrastructure to ensure a safe homecoming. Continue reading

  • The U.S.-Mexico border fence in Nogales, Ariz. on June 27, 2009. Photo by Flickr user Ryan Bavetta
    June 10, 2014   BY Jude Joffe-Block, Fronteras 

    The federal government is scrambling to house a surge of Central American migrant children traveling alone across the border. These children are supposed to be held in Department of Homeland Security custody fewer than 72 hours before they’re transferred to shelters. But as Jude Joffe-Block reports from the Fronteras Desk, the government can’t keep up.
    Obama administration officials said Monday federal agencies are requesting more than $2 billion from Congress to pay for more shelters. Continue reading