genetic engineering

  • An aedes aegypti mosquitoes that carries the Zika virus is seen at a laboratory of the National Center for the Control of Tropical Diseases (CENCET) in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Photo by Stringer /Anadolu Agency/Getty Images
    March 3, 2016  

    As mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue fever and Zika virus continue to ravage Brazil, scientists are racing to fight back. Their latest tactic: genetically engineered mosquitoes that will pass along fatal mutations to their offspring, destroying mosquito populations from within. But some researchers worry our limited knowledge of Zika could throw a wrench into this plan. Miles O’Brien reports. Continue reading

  • June 7, 2007  

    In new studies published by three independent teams of scientists, skin cells of mice were successfully converted into stem cells. Specialists explain what the findings mean for human stem cell research and the potential for bypassing the controversial use of embryonic stem cells. Continue reading

  • December 28, 2006   BY  

    The Food and Drug Administration issued a preliminary decision Thursday saying that food products from cloned animals are safe to eat. Under the proposed guidelines, the products would also not be required to carry a special label. Continue reading