health

  • April 18, 2012  

    A study published Wednesday in the journal Nature revealed that scientists have managed to convert damaged tissue into functioning heart muscle by inducing mild heart attacks on lab mice then coaxing their hearts into rebuilding themselves. In collaboration with KQED’s QUEST program, correspondent Spencer Michels reports. Continue reading

  • March 22, 2012  

    The Supreme Court is set to hear three days of arguments next week over challenges to the health reform law President Obama signed two years ago. Judy Woodruff, The National Law Journal’s Marcia Coyle and Health Affairs’ Susan Dentzer preview the upcoming arguments. Continue reading

  • March 21, 2012  

    Students with learning differences are twice as likely as their peers to drop out of high school, according to the National Center for Learning Disabilities. Betty Ann Bowser visited an elementary school that practices early intervention — engaging students with technology and art to improve their chances of earning a diploma. Continue reading

  • March 21, 2012  

    A daily low dose of aspirin could potentially combat a variety of cancers, according to a series of studies published in the medical journal The Lancet. Ray Suarez discusses the studies and the health benefits and risks of aspirin with Harvard Medical School’s Dr. Andrew Chan, who wrote a commentary on the studies. Continue reading

  • February 28, 2012  

    A controversial resettlement program in Ethiopia is the latest battleground in the global race to secure prized farmland and water. Correspondent Cassandra Herrman reports as part of the Food for 9 Billion series, a NewsHour partnership with the Center for Investigative Reporting, Homelands Productions and Marketplace. Continue reading

  • February 27, 2012  

    An unconventional approach to recovery and coping, music therapy is a field of medicine capturing new attention due to its role in helping Gabrielle Giffords recover from a gunshot. Correspondent Spencer Michels reports on the versatility of music in a medical setting, but the difficulty of quantifying its effectiveness. Continue reading

  • February 20, 2012  

    Health officials in India are close to wiping out polio, a disease forgotten in most of the world but still endemic in some developing countries. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on India’s challenge to remain vigilant in its campaign to immunize children one mouthful at a time. Continue reading

  • February 15, 2012  

    While more than 250 drugs were declared in short supply in the U.S. this past year, the latest worries centered on one called Methotrexate, considered essential for children battling leukemia. Ray Suarez discusses the problem and latest developments with Dr. Peter Adamson of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Continue reading

  • January 25, 2012  

    The latest in Spanish-language soap operas, or telenovelas, have encased more than typical romance and personal scandal, debuting some very clear messages on health care for Latinos in the U.S., specifically Colorado. Health correspondent Betty Ann Bowser reports on the creators’ reasoning in writing beyond the usual storylines. Continue reading

  • January 12, 2012  

    Four decades ago, President Nixon signed a law that would change the way cancer research was funded in an effort to develop better treatments and cure more patients. Health correspondent Betty Ann Bowser explores the positive developments pediatric cancer research has realized in the last 40 years. Continue reading