Health

  • USA, New Jersey, Jersey City, Close-up of hands using smartphone
    May 27, 2016   BY and  

    A major new study provides evidence of a possible link between cellphone exposure and cancer, at least in rats — findings that are likely to spark a fierce new debate about the 21st century’s most ubiquitous tech gadget. Continue reading

  • MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria strain is seen in a petri dish containing agar jelly for bacterial culture in a microbiological laboratory in Berlin March 1, 2008. MRSA is a drug-resistant "superbug", which can cause deadly infections.    REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch (GERMANY) - RTR1XRUZ
    May 26, 2016  

    A 49-year-old Pennsylvania woman has been found carrying a strain of E. coli that is resistant to last-resort antibiotics, which researchers say marks the first appearance of a drug-proof bacteria on U.S. soil. Scientists in Pennsylvania are working with the Centers for Disease Control to find a way to fight the superbug. Hari Sreenivasan talks to Dr. Beth Bell of the CDC for more.
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  • A sign warns residents their neighborhood will be sprayed with pesticide by a vector control team after increasing numbers of mosquitoes have tested positive for West Nile virus in San Diego, California, U.S. May 18, 2016.  REUTERS/Mike Blake  - RTSFJ93
    May 24, 2016  

    In February, the White House issued a $1.9 billion plan for combating Zika virus in the U.S., including provisions for mosquito control, education and research into a vaccine. While GOP lawmakers opposed that plan, the Senate passed a bipartisan $1.1 billion compromise bill last week. Judy Woodruff talks to Rep. Bob Gibbs, R-Ohio, and Rep. Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., for more on the funding debate. Continue reading

  • The Nutrition Facts label is seen on a box of Raisin Bran at a store in New York February 27, 2014. Packaged foods sold in the United States would display calorie counts more prominently and include the amount of added sugar under a proposal to significantly update nutritional labels for the first time in 20 years as health officials seek to reduce obesity and combat related diseases such as diabetes. The Food and Drug Administration said on Thursday its proposal would also ensure that the amount of calories listed per serving reflects the portions that people typically eat. That change may result in per-serving calorie counts doubling for some foods such as ice cream. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS BUSINESS) - RTR3FSVG
    May 20, 2016  

    The FDA rolled out new rules for nutrition labels on packaged foods and drinks Friday, designed to highlight the amount of “added sugar” and calories in a given product. The measures, which take effect this summer, are part of a new effort to combat obesity and diabetes. William Brangham talks to Allison Aubrey of NPR for more on what the changes represent and whether they will make a difference. Continue reading

  • U.S. first lady Michelle Obama first unveiled proposed updates to nutrition facts labels during remarks in the East Room of the White House in Washington, February 27, 2014. Photo by Jonathan Ernst/REUTERS
    May 20, 2016  

    Nutrition advocates have long asked for the added sugars line on the label because it’s impossible for consumers to know how much sugar in an item is naturally occurring, like that in fruit and dairy products, and how much is added by the manufacturer. Think an apple vs. apple sauce, which comes in sweetened and unsweetened varieties. Continue reading

  • DNA is a long code of instructions to build every tissue in our body. But there are little markers along the way that tell cells how to read the DNA. And those markers turn genes on and off, which could affect disease or even your personal preferences. Image by Scott Tysick/Getty Images
    May 19, 2016  

    The field of genetics has seen exponential growth in recent years, and today may be on the verge of further breakthroughs that will radically change the way we function as a species. But to understand genetics now, one must first understand its complex past dating back to the 19th century, a past chronicled in Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee’s new book “The Gene.” Mukherjee joins Judy Woodruff for more. Continue reading

  • A computer screen displays the genetic sequence of the H1N1 swine flu virus at the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene in Baltimore, September 3, 2009. The new H1N1 virus has killed 36 U.S. children, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported on Thursday.   REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst    (UNITED STATES HEALTH) - RTR27EPI
    May 13, 2016  

    Every year, thousands of young people who seemed otherwise healthy die suddenly. The reason sometimes is long-rooted, secret gene mutations passed down through the generations. Doctors at the Scripps Translational Science Institute are using gene sequencing and “molecular autopsies” to uncover these hidden mutations and allow patients to take preventative action. David Wagner of KPBS reports.
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  • An edes aegypti mosquito is seen inside a test tube as part of a research on preventing the spread of the Zika virus and other mosquito-borne diseases at a control and prevention center in Guadalupe, neighbouring Monterrey, Mexico, March 8, 2016. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril/File Photo - RTX2DV6U
    May 12, 2016  

    As if a crumbling economy and crippling debt weren’t enough to handle, Puerto Rico is also in the throes of a new looming crisis: the mosquito-borne Zika virus is gaining ground. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control predicts an astounding 20 percent of the island’s 3.5 million people will likely contract Zika this year alone. Jeffrey Brown goes to the front line of the battle against the virus.
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  • Photo illustration by Daniel Beerehulak/Getty Images
    May 10, 2016   BY  

    The Joint Commission, a nonprofit that accredits health care organizations and programs, calls maternal deaths “sentinel” events. “For every woman who dies, there are 50 who are very ill, suffering significant complications of pregnancy, labor and delivery,” Dr. William Callaghan, a senior CDC scientist who studies maternal morbidity, said in the Joint Commission’s 2010 alert. Continue reading

  • Flossie
    May 7, 2016  

    Flossie Lewis says she’s 91 years old and badly crippled. But just because her body is starting to go doesn’t mean her personality or character should. Taking walks, watching politics and writing a little bit of light verse help keep Lewis as optimistic now as she was at 15. Lewis gives her Brief But Spectacular take on growing old with grace. Continue reading

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