Hurricane Katrina

  • September 12, 2005  

    A report from Louisiana about the post-Hurricane Katrina threats to public health. Continue reading

  • September 12, 2005  

    The largest mass migration in the Unites States since the 1930s has left nearly a million people homeless, jobless and in unfamiliar territory following Hurricane Katrina. Following a report from Baton Rouge, three experts discuss the immense challenges ahead. Continue reading

  • September 9, 2005    

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s mission is to “lead America to prepare for, respond to and recover from disasters with a vision of ‘A Nation Prepared.'” Continue reading

  • September 9, 2005    

    For the nation’s insurance companies, the Aug. 29, 2005 landfall of Hurricane Katrina, and subsequent flooding that caused thousands to flee their homes, is shaping up to be the costliest domestic natural disaster in U.S. history. Continue reading

  • September 9, 2005  

    Essayist Roger Rosenblatt explores public policy and the consequences of Hurricane Katrina. Continue reading

  • September 9, 2005  

    Public opinion polls show a drop in public support for all levels of government after their response to Hurricane Katrina. Continue reading

  • September 9, 2005  

    Engineers have begun repairing levees damaged in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina hit, and researchers are using the hurricane’s data to try to lengthen warning times. Continue reading

  • September 9, 2005  

    Amid criticism of Michael Brown’s qualifications, Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff announced that Thad Allen will replace Brown as head of FEMA’s ground operations. After an update from a reporter, two former homeland security employees discuss FEMA’s organization and its future after Hurricane Katrina. Continue reading

  • September 9, 2005  

    Analysts David Brooks and Tom Oliphant discuss low public opinions of all levels of government in the wake of Hurricane Katrina as well as changes in FEMA’s leadership and next week’s Supreme Court confirmation hearings for John Roberts. Continue reading

  • September 8, 2005   BY  

    The House and Senate on Thursday quickly approved an additional $52 billion for the Hurricane Katrina relief effort, bringing the total federal cost of the recovery to $62 billion, easily eclipsing spending on any domestic disaster. Continue reading