#IMHO

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  • When you know your aging parents have found home
    February 21, 2017
  • January 6, 2017  

    Why are there so few black male teachers? Chris Emdin of Columbia University suggests that a cycle of failure haunts students and their teachers. Students act out, so teachers tighten the rules; more restrictions combined with dull and irrelevant curricula cause students to fail, and teachers quit — thinking it’s their fault. Emdin raps his Humble Opinion on why the system needs to be changed. Continue reading

  • December 16, 2016  

    Recently, free speech and censorship on college campuses have been hotly debated. Nathan Heller of The New Yorker believes that the solution to this dilemma lies not in the way we speak, but in the way we listen. When people travel, Heller argues, they process their experiences with a fresh, open mind. This is Heller’s humble opinion on listening as if you’re on a journey. Continue reading

  • December 7, 2016  

    Growing up in a small town in North Carolina, Lauren Collins never needed to speak a foreign language outside of high school Spanish classes. It wasn’t until she met her French-speaking husband and moved to Switzerland that she felt the need to become bilingual. She offers her humble opinion on the value of learning a new language. Continue reading

  • December 2, 2016  

    Keith Strudler wants to see the end of football played by very young children — and not just because of the danger of concussions. He argues that the sport teaches kids to act rough and selfish, as well as that masculinity is strength, while femininity is cheering from the sidelines. Older players are able to separate the sport from life, he says, but for younger ones, that’s not easy. Continue reading

  • November 30, 2016  

    Writer Carmen Maria Machado wasn’t totally surprised when her parents informed her, 31 years into their marriage, that they were planning to divorce. But the news did produce a wave of anxiety over her own upcoming wedding. She shares how she and her fiancee are moving forward, keeping in mind her parents’ mistakes, as part of our re-launched “Essay” series — now called “In My Humble Opinion.” Continue reading

  • October 28, 2016  

    Fashion consultant and television personality Tim Gunn thinks it’s time clothing designers offered styles that work for everybody — not only extremely thin models. After all, the average American woman is between sizes 16 and 18, or what the industry calls “plus size.” He admits the task of democratizing fashion will be a challenging one, as designs must be re-imagined and not merely resized. Continue reading

  • September 27, 2016  

    The best seven months of Tracy Grant’s life were the months she spent caring for her husband with terminal cancer. Suddenly, she says, there were no “bad days.” Petty work mishaps didn’t seem nearly as bad when all she could do was look forward to the little things, like spontaneous laughter or the night sky. Those final months made up the best gift he gave her, Grant says. Continue reading

  • September 20, 2016  

    When Jennine Capó Crucet was a college freshman, her parents stayed for her entire orientation. It wasn’t because they especially wanted to; they just didn’t know what they were meant to do. As a first-generation college student, Crucet was not aware of the norms understood by most of her peers. Now a novelist and professor, she gives her take on what first-generation students need. Continue reading

  • August 30, 2016  

    Novelist and poet Russell Banks used to feel guilty about not taking pictures to document his trips. Now, he doesn’t even bring a camera with him, believing that visually recording an experience would effectively remove him from it. In contrast, describing sights in writing imprints images upon his memory. Banks shares an essay on how a camera can distinguish between a traveler and a tourist. Continue reading

  • August 23, 2016  

    In her new book “Girls & Sex,” Peggy Orenstein suggests that we re-think sexual intimacy, in both education and our everyday lives. While she acknowledges the importance of the national debate on campus sexual assault, Orenstein also urges us to broaden our definition of “sex” and talk candidly about what happens after consent — arguing that if we don’t guide our teenagers, pop culture will. Continue reading

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