#IMHO

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  • Elementary student takes a math test
    June 22, 2016  

    The United States, Liberia and Myanmar are the only countries in the world that do not
    officially use the metric system for weights and measurements. On the brink of Thursday’s Brexit vote, author Daniel Pink wonders when, if ever, the U.S. might join the rest of the metric world.
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  • June 1, 2016  

    With horror stories of extremist violence dominating headlines around the globe, it’s easy to get worked up over the threat, however improbable, of domestic terrorism. National security analyst and mom Juliette Kayyem says there’s no such thing as perfect safety, but there are steps you can take to ensure your family makes it through times of crisis — and it starts with being prepared. Continue reading

  • May 25, 2016  

    Duke University biologist Sheila Patek has faced criticism from lawmakers over her research into mantis shrimp and trap-jaw ants, with some calling her government-funded studies a waste of taxpayer money. But according to Patek, not only do her findings have important practical applications, but scientific inquiry is most fruitful when knowledge is sought for its own sake, not to justify budgets.
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  • May 2, 2016  

    Paton Blough has two labels he will have to bear for the rest of his life: “bipolar” and “convicted felon.” Having been arrested during his delusional episodes, Blough uses his experiences to help train police officers in crisis management when dealing with the mentally ill. Continue reading

  • April 13, 2016  

    Have you ever had a dish turn out wrong no matter how closely you stick to the recipe?
    According to legendary chef Jacques Pépin, recipes describe a process that can never be duplicated exactly; what you need to understand is the “idea” behind the recipe, and use it as a point of departure. Continue reading

  • April 12, 2016  

    Does it seem these days that politicians are always speaking yet never really say anything? Give them a break, says Barton Swaim, former speechwriter for South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford. According to Swaim, we expect them to speak too often and about too many subjects. Continue reading

  • March 29, 2016  

    Faced with a rising national wave of opioid addiction and its consequences, families, law enforcement and political leaders around the nation are linking arms to save souls. But 30 years ago, it was a different story. Ekow Yankah, a Cardozo School of Law professor, reflects on how race affects our national response to drug abuse. Continue reading

  • March 23, 2016  

    After his last deployment to Afghanistan, decorated Marine veteran and writer Elliot Ackerman went to report on the civil war in Syria. What he found was friendship and a shared disillusion over the hopes of revolution. In this essay, Ackerman explores the deep wounds and strong bonds forged by war. Continue reading

  • March 21, 2016  

    Decorated Marine veteran and writer Elliot Ackerman lives with his family in Istanbul — the site of four suicide bombings this year alone. Finding himself confronted by violence again, Ackerman reflects on living in a place targeted by terrorists. Continue reading

  • March 18, 2016  

    This month, many prospective college students are anticipating an admissions decision from their dream school. Keith Frome, author of “How’s My Kid Doing?” has worked with high school students across the country and believes he has found the key to encouraging them to consider college: peer pressure. Frome offers his unique take on the college application process. Continue reading