Jeffrey Brown

  • Ralph Stanley performs at a campaign event for former Sen. John Edwards at the University of South Carolina in 2008 in Lancaster, South Carolina. Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images
    June 24, 2016  

    After a long battle with skin cancer, bluegrass pioneer Ralph Stanley died overnight at the age of 89. Since forming his first band in 1946, Stanley’s haunting voice came to epitomize the bluegrass genre’s “High Lonesome” sound, and he won a Grammy for his performance of “O Death” in the film “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” The NewsHour looks back at Jeffrey Brown’s 2002 interview with Stanley. Continue reading

  • Cole Porter
    June 21, 2016  

    The sophisticated rhymes and erudite imagery of Cole Porter’s lyrics made him one of the nation’s preeminent songsmiths. But an overlooked element of Porter’s legacy is the music underlying those lyrics, which Rob Kapilow argues is essential to understanding the work’s genius. In honor of the composer’s 125th birthday this month, Kapilow joins Jeffrey Brown to offer his take on Cole Porter. Continue reading

  • Lin-Manuel Miranda, writer and star of the Tony Award nominated "Hamilton", arrives for the 2016 Tony Awards Meet The Nominees Press Reception in Manhattan, New York, U.S., May 4, 2016.  REUTERS/Andrew Kelly  - RTX2CU5J
    June 10, 2016  

    The 70th annual Tony Awards, celebrating the best in live Broadway theater, air Sunday night. All eyes are on Lin-Manuel Miranda’s acclaimed historical hip-hop musical “Hamilton,” which has received a record 16 nominations. But there are a slew of other productions that could garner surprise wins. Jeffrey Brown reports on a crowded and critically beloved Tony field. Continue reading

  • Photo by Spoleto Festival USA
    June 9, 2016  

    Since its first performance in 1935, “Porgy and Bess” has earned acclaim as one of American history’s best pieces of musical theater. But over time, many have come to view the opera’s black characters as stereotypes. Now, a new production in Charleston aims to rectify the issue by emphasizing the characters’ — and the city’s — African roots. Jeffrey Brown reports.
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  • Expanded Disneyland California Adventure Park features signs from Route 66 as a theme in Cars Land at the park in Anaheim, California June 5, 2012. The debut of Cars Land marks the completion of a five-year expansion at Disney California Adventure. Picture taken June 5.  REUTERS/Alex Gallardo (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT TRAVEL) - RTR33LDR
    June 6, 2016  

    U.S. Route 66, running 2,400 miles from Chicago to Santa Monica, was once one of the most-traveled highways in the nation; John Steinbeck referred to it as the “Mother Road.” But the rise of the Interstate Highway System led to a loss of traffic, devastating communities that relied on the route’s travelers. Now, Route 66 is making a comeback, thanks to its storied past. Jeffrey Brown reports.
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  • The Government Development Bank (GDB) is seen in San Juan, November 30, 2015. Puerto Rican officials talked tough ahead of a major debt payment due on May 2, 2016, with the U.S. territory's governor predicting default, and chances slipping for a restructuring deal with creditors.   Reuters/Alvin Baez/File Photo - RTX2BYU8
    May 6, 2016  

    For years, the Puerto Rican economy has been in decline, and the U.S. territory is now on the brink of disaster, with $72 billion of overall debt and an unemployment rate twice that of the mainland. As the island’s government is forced to suspend funding for vital services, hundreds of Puerto Ricans are leaving every day, while those who remain struggle to stay afloat. Jeffrey Brown reports. Continue reading

  • Johannes_Brahms_1853
    May 6, 2016  

    Saturday will mark the 183rd birthday of the celebrated German composer and pianist Johannes Brahms. A complicated and utterly self-guarded man, Brahms liked to claim that his music didn’t flow from his heart, but the soulful and passionate nature of his compositions tells another tale. For more on what makes Brahms’ music so beautiful and enduring, Jeffrey Brown talks to composer Rob Kapilow. Continue reading

  • CHICAGO - JULY 11:  Violinist Rachel Barton Pine performs during the Great Performers Of Illinois Festival in Millennium Park in Chicago, Illinois on July 11, 2010.  (Photo By Raymond Boyd/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
    April 15, 2016  

    Rachel Barton Pine is one of the most accomplished violinists in the world, but her upbringing wasn’t one of privilege — as a ten-year-old prodigy with an out-of-work father, she bought her concert clothes in thrift stores and relied on space heaters for warmth. Now, Pine uses her success to help other disadvantaged violinists escape poverty. Jeffrey Brown reports. Continue reading

  • Full Frame Shot Of Books In Shelves
    April 9, 2016   BY  

    More than 500 authors are set to appear at the LA Times Festival of Books this weekend for one of the largest literary events of the year. Continue reading

  • WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon says a U.S. drone strike on Saturday struck a training camp for al-Shabaab fighters in Somalia who were preparing to launch a large-scale attack, likely against African or U.S. personnel. Photo by John Moore/Getty Images
    March 18, 2016  

    One of the most controversial elements of President Obama’s national security policy is the use of drones to kill terrorists. The newly released movie “Eye in the Sky” provides a front-row seat to the debate taking place among national security officials. Jeffrey Brown reports on the movie and the implications of the use of drones.
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