Jeffrey Brown

  • June 6, 2016  

    U.S. Route 66, running 2,400 miles from Chicago to Santa Monica, was once one of the most-traveled highways in the nation; John Steinbeck referred to it as the “Mother Road.” But the rise of the Interstate Highway System led to a loss of traffic, devastating communities that relied on the route’s travelers. Now, Route 66 is making a comeback, thanks to its storied past. Jeffrey Brown reports.
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  • May 6, 2016  

    For years, the Puerto Rican economy has been in decline, and the U.S. territory is now on the brink of disaster, with $72 billion of overall debt and an unemployment rate twice that of the mainland. As the island’s government is forced to suspend funding for vital services, hundreds of Puerto Ricans are leaving every day, while those who remain struggle to stay afloat. Jeffrey Brown reports. Continue reading

  • May 6, 2016  

    Saturday will mark the 183rd birthday of the celebrated German composer and pianist Johannes Brahms. A complicated and utterly self-guarded man, Brahms liked to claim that his music didn’t flow from his heart, but the soulful and passionate nature of his compositions tells another tale. For more on what makes Brahms’ music so beautiful and enduring, Jeffrey Brown talks to composer Rob Kapilow. Continue reading

  • April 15, 2016  

    Rachel Barton Pine is one of the most accomplished violinists in the world, but her upbringing wasn’t one of privilege — as a ten-year-old prodigy with an out-of-work father, she bought her concert clothes in thrift stores and relied on space heaters for warmth. Now, Pine uses her success to help other disadvantaged violinists escape poverty. Jeffrey Brown reports. Continue reading

  • Full Frame Shot Of Books In Shelves
    April 9, 2016   BY  

    More than 500 authors are set to appear at the LA Times Festival of Books this weekend for one of the largest literary events of the year. Continue reading

  • March 18, 2016  

    One of the most controversial elements of President Obama’s national security policy is the use of drones to kill terrorists. The newly released movie “Eye in the Sky” provides a front-row seat to the debate taking place among national security officials. Jeffrey Brown reports on the movie and the implications of the use of drones.
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  • March 18, 2016  

    Turkey and the European Union reached an agreement Friday over solutions to the ongoing migrant crisis in Eastern Europe, with Turkey taking back Syrian refugees currently stranded in Greece in exchange for financial aid and closer travel and political ties to the EU. Jeffrey Brown asks Matthew Karnitschnig of Politico and special correspondent Malcolm Brabant for more information on the deal.
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  • March 17, 2016  

    SeaWorld has made headlines several times in the past decade: trainer Dawn Brancheau was killed by a captive orca during a live show in 2010, and a 2013 documentary focused intense scrutiny on the family-oriented theme park over the use of killer whales as show animals. On Thursday, SeaWorld announced that it would no longer breed or keep orcas. Jeffrey Brown reports. Continue reading

  • March 16, 2016  

    Is Bowe Bergdahl a misguided young soldier or a deserter and a traitor? A military court will soon answer that question, as Bergdahl — an Army sergeant who left his post in June 2009 and was captured by the Taliban — is now facing a court-martial on charges of desertion and endangering troops. Jeffrey Brown takes a look at the transcript of Bergdahl’s interview with the Army’s senior investigator.
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  • March 15, 2016  

    March Madness has arrived once more — and yet again, the University of North Carolina Tar Heels are in the hunt for a national championship. A new book by sportswriter John Feinstein takes an inside look at one of UNC’s legendary coaches and the two other iconic state basketball figures with whom he formed unique trio. Feinstein joins Jeffrey Brown to discuss “The Legends Club.” Continue reading