journalism

  • November 10, 2014   BY Eric Tucker, Associated Press 

    The Associated Press on Monday demanded assurances from the Justice Department that the FBI will never again impersonate a member of the news media, following revelations that an agent in Seattle portrayed himself as an AP journalist as part of a criminal investigation. Continue reading

  • datelinesyria
    October 23, 2014  

    Telling the stories of conflict in Syria and Iraq has become prohibitively dangerous for many news organizations; more than 70 journalists have been killed while covering the Syrian war. While a few international reporters remain in the country, much of the reporting is now done from the outside. Hari Sreenivasan talks to Deborah Amos of NPR and John Daniszewski of the Associated Press. Continue reading

  • mattbai
    October 2, 2014  

    When did the more intimate — and sometimes sordid — aspects of the personal lives of politicians become fair game for reporters? Matt Bai of Yahoo News says it was back in 1987, when presidential candidate Gary Hart’s extramarital dalliance was made public. Bai joins Gwen Ifill to discuss his new book, “All the Truth Is Out: The Week Politics Went Tabloid.” Continue reading

  • Photo by Flickr user Andy Piper
    September 14, 2014  

    Women hold few positions of authority in newsrooms across the United States, according to a Nieman report published earlier this week. Some experts say this disparity could have far-reaching impacts for consumers of the mainstream media. Anna Griffin, a reporter and editor at The Oregonian newspaper and the report’s author, joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the industry-wide problem. Continue reading

  • Photo by Flickr user Andy Piper
    September 12, 2014   BY Corinne Segal 

    The journalism industry is severely lacking in leadership by women and racial minorities, according to the Nieman Reports story published Wednesday.
    Continue reading

  • Estonia's President Toomas Hendrik Ilves (L) and US President Barack Obama (2nd L) inspect a military honor guard prior to meetings at the Kadriorg Palace in Tallinn, Estonia, September 3, 2014. Photo by Ilmars Znotins/AFP/Getty Images
    September 3, 2014  

    Unrest in Ukraine, and Islamic State militants in Iraq have dominated news coverage for the past three months. Judy Woodruff evaluates the Obama administration’s response to these challenges with Vali Nasr, a former State Department official, Eric Edelman, a former State and Defense Department official and David Ignatius of The Washington Post. Continue reading

  • newswrap
    September 3, 2014  

    In our news wrap Wednesday, 50-year-old Henry McCollum and his half-brother Leon Brown were set free from prison in North Carolina, 30 years after they were falsely convicted of raping and murdering an 11-year-old girl. DNA evidence shows the girl may have been killed by another man, a judge ruled Tuesday. Meanwhile, it has been confirmed that Islamic State militants murdered U.S. reporter Steven Sotloff. Continue reading

  • steven sotloff
    September 2, 2014  

    For reaction, Judy Woodruff talks to Charles Sennott of The GroundTruth Project. Then, former National Security Council staff Lt. Col. Douglas Ollivant (Ret.), former Counterterrorism Official Daniel Benjamin and former State Department official Anne-Marie Slaughter discuss how the killing affects U.S. policy toward the Islamic State group. Continue reading

  • A fighter of the Islamic State group carries their flag. Screen grab from PBS NewsHour.
    September 2, 2014  

    In a gruesome video, Islamic State radicals purportedly beheaded Steven Sotloff — a 31-year-old American freelancer who went missing in Syria last year. In the video posted on Aug. 19 of the beheading of James Foley, the militant group warned Sotloff would suffer the same fate if U.S. airstrikes continued in Iraq. Judy Woodruff reports. Continue reading

  • hostages1
    August 27, 2014  

    A wave of American hostages held by Islamic extremists has raised questions about the U.S. policy not to pay ransoms. Jeffrey Brown talks to David Rohde of Reuters and Brian Jenkins of RAND Corporation for views on the divergence between the United States and other countries on this issue. Continue reading

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