Literature

  • January 8, 2014   BY Arts Desk  

    J. Michael Lennon, author of “Norman Mailer: A Double Life,” spoke to chief arts correspondent Jeffrey Brown about the ambitions and insecurities of the literary giant. Norman Mailer had quite a public persona. He was a Pulitzer Prize winning American … Continue reading

  • October 16, 2013   BY Victoria Fleischer  

    The 45th Man Booker Prize for Fiction was awarded Tuesday to Eleanor Catton for “The Luminaries.” Set in 1860s New Zealand during the Gold Rush, Catton’s second novel is a murder mystery that constructs its own astrological calendar to determine … Continue reading

  • July 10, 2013   BY Mary Jo Brooks  

    Liao Yiwu was in his early 30s when he was arrested for writing and performing a poem about the brutality of the Tiananmen Square Massacre in 1989. A new memoir about his time in prison called “For a Song and A Hundred Songs” has just been published.
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  • July 10, 2013   BY Mary Jo Brooks  

    By Liao Yiwu, Translated by Wenguang Huang (Composed on the morning of June 4, 1989) Dedicated to those who were killed on June 4, 1989 Dedicated to the 200th anniversary of the French Revolution Leap! Howl! Fly! Run! Freedom feels … Continue reading

  • July 4, 2013   BY Meena Ganesan  

    O July 4, 2001, former poet laureate Robert Pinsky read aloud for NewsHour viewers the concluding section of Walt Whitman’s “By Blue Ontario’s Shore,” Pinsky said, “Whitman’s list of what he ‘will not shirk’ remains an attractive agenda and can inspire a credible patriotism.” Here, for the 4th of July, are Walt Whitman’s lines:
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  • June 13, 2013   BY Jeffrey Brown  

    Author Walter Mosley has written more than 40 books. His new mystery novel, “Little Green,” revives one of the best-known, longest-running characters in American literature. Ezekiel “Easy” Rawlins, Mosley’s fictional private eye, was last seen driving off a cliff.
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  • November 18, 2010   BY Molly Finnegan 

    Known for her poetry and her rock ‘n’ roll, music legend Patti Smith has now been honored for her prose with a National Book Award, given out Wednesday night in New York.
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  • July 8, 2010   BY Carolyn O'Hara  

    “What He’s Poised To Do” is a new story collection by New Yorker editor Ben Greenman. The stories feature and often take place in the form of letters, and explore our attempts to connect over time.
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  • May 21, 2010   BY Quinn Bowman  

    “Island Beneath the Sea,” by author Isabel Allende, is set in the early 19th-century, amid colonial powers and slavery, and a chaotic period in Caribbean history. It also involves two places very much in the news in our own time: Haiti and New Orleans.
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  • March 15, 2010   BY Hari Sreenivasan  

    “July in Washington” is from Robert Lowell “Collected Poems” (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2003). Lowell, who died in 1977, is best known for his volume “Life Studies,” “but his true greatness as an American poet lies in the astonishing variety of his work.”
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