Margaret Warner

  • May 16, 2014  

    President Obama and France’s President Francois Hollande agreed that Russia will face “significant additional costs” for undermining the Ukrainian government. Chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner joins Judy Woodruff to discuss a show of solidarity in Eastern Ukraine against the pro-Russian separatists, efforts to increase dialogue between Kiev and different factions and Putin’s next move. Continue reading

  • May 15, 2014  

    Glenn Greenwald was the first reporter to meet with Edward Snowden when the former NSA contractor wanted to disclose secrets of the agency. Greenwald sits down with chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner in Washington to discuss that initial encounter and what he learned, detailed in his new book, “No Place to Hide.” Continue reading

  • April 17, 2014  

    After several hours of negotiation, diplomats including Secretary of State John Kerry and Russia’s Sergei Lavrov announced a tentative agreement to ease conflict in Eastern Ukraine. But can Russia and Ukraine actually agree on the real terms of the deal? Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner joins Gwen Ifill to discuss the politics and prospects. Continue reading

  • April 16, 2014  

    The slow-motion takeover of Ukrainian territory continued as armed men in military uniforms rolled into the city of Slovyansk, flying the Russian flag. In Eastern Ukraine, locals were dismayed by the brewing military conflict, but echoed demands for more autonomy from Kiev. Chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner reports on the latest reactions from the international community. Continue reading

  • April 8, 2014  

    Ukrainian security forces managed to regain power in Kharkiv, yet pro-Russian demonstrators have held onto control of government buildings in two other cities in the country’s east. Chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the swift pro-Russian escalation and obstacles faced by the Ukrainian government. Continue reading

  • April 7, 2014  

    Chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner joins Gwen Ifill for a closer look at the historic 2014 presidential election in Afghanistan, including the role of Afghan security forces in keeping polling safe, rumors of voting fraud, whether the United States favors a candidate, as well as what distinguished this election for average citizens. Continue reading

  • March 31, 2014  

    Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev promised increased money for infrastructure and higher pensions and salaries during a visit to Crimea. Meanwhile, Russia withdrew one battalion from the border region, but Secretary of State John Kerry insisted that the U.S. is looking for more. Chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner joins Gwen Ifill for an update after a reporting trip to Ukraine. Continue reading

  • March 24, 2014  

    Gwen Ifill talks to chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner, reporting from Kiev, about the vulnerability of the Ukrainian military, as well as how Ukrainians are reacting to the secession of Crimea and their feelings about the role of the West in their conflict with Russia. Continue reading

  • March 17, 2014  

    After Sunday’s referendum, Crimea’s parliament dispatched a delegation to Moscow to work out details of joining Russia, reflecting the jubilation of that region’s ethnic Russian majority. But not everyone in Crimea is happy about the results. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner talks with Judy Woodruff from Simferopol about the reactions on the ground. Continue reading

  • Margaret Warner in Simeropol, Crimea on referendum day, March 16, 2014,
    March 16, 2014  

    Defying international protests that called the process illegitimate, Crimea today went ahead with a referendum and voted overwhelmingly to join Russia. What was it like at the polls today? Hari Sreenivasan speaks with NewsHour’s chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner about today’s vote and what that could mean for Crimea in the coming days. Continue reading