medicine

  • With growing health care demand, will the U.S. have enough doctors in the future? A doctor checks a patient during an examination at the St. John's Well Child and Family Center in Los Angeles, California, in Sept., 2013. Photo by Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images
    November 24, 2014   BY Julie Rovner, Kaiser Health News 

    Many medical groups, led by the Association of American Medical Colleges, say there’s little doubt. “We think the shortage is going to be close to 130,000 in the next 10 to 12 years,” says Atul Grover, the group’s chief public policy officer. But others, particularly health care economists, are less convinced. “Concerns that the nation faces a looming physician shortage, particularly in primary care specialties, are common,” wrote an expert panel of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in a report on the financing of graduate medical education in July. “The committee did not find credible evidence to support such claims.”

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  • ebola
    October 30, 2014  

    Sheri Fink has been reporting on the human toll of the Ebola outbreak for The New York Times. Judy Woodruff talks to Fink from Monrovia about the tough decisions doctors must make in fighting the disease. Also from the New York Times, Ben Solomon offers a video report from inside an Ebola treatment center, where health care workers try to help their patients find hope. Continue reading

  • doctorswithoutborders
    October 24, 2014  

    The New York doctor infected with Ebola was working in Guinea for Doctors Without Borders, a humanitarian organization that deploys specialists to provide medical help in crisis zones all over the world. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro offers a deeper look at the organization’s mission and the risks of its work. Continue reading

  • Step Forward MAN PARALYZED walik monitor
    October 21, 2014  

    A Bulgarian man who was paralyzed from the chest down after a 2010 stabbing can now walk after a pioneering transplant in Poland. Cells from the man’s nose were used to repair his spinal nerves in a surgery that gives thousands of paralytics new hope for movement. Alex Thompson of Independent Television News has the report. Continue reading

  • Jeff Hulbert from Annapolis, Maryland, dressed in a protective suit and mask holds a poster demanding for a halt of all flights from West Africa,as he protests outside the White House in Washington, DC on October 16, 2014. Photo by Mladen Antonio/AFP/Getty Images
    October 16, 2014  

    As new cases have been diagnosed in the U.S. and the Centers for Disease Control expands its investigation, national concern has skyrocketed. Gwen Ifill explores the psychology behind the public anxiety with Dr. Eden Wells of the University of Michigan and Valerie Reyna of Cornell University. Continue reading

  • ebola
    October 9, 2014  

    Despite increased pledges of support for the Ebola epidemic, Nancy Aossey of International Medical Corps says there are still not enough operational efforts on the ground. Gwen Ifill talks to Aossey, CEO of one of the few nongovernmental groups treating patients in West Africa, about the current treatment resources available for patients and training efforts and equipment for health workers. Continue reading

  • gawande_bookfly
    October 9, 2014  

    Modern medicine has a fundamental failure in its approach toward aging and dying, says Dr. Atul Gawande: “We don’t recognize that people have priorities besides just living longer.” Gawande, a surgeon and the author of a new book, “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End,” joins Jeffrey Brown to discuss his education in mortality. Continue reading

  • ebola1
    October 8, 2014  

    Go inside the Emergency Operations Center at the CDC, the information hub where doctors and scientists are at the front lines of the effort to contain and control the Ebola virus. Special correspondent Kathleen McCleery reports from Atlanta on the challenges of keeping up with the fast-moving epidemic. Continue reading

  • goldenyears
    October 3, 2014  

    Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, an oncologist and one of the country’s leading health care experts, says by age 75 he would opt out of medical treatments in order to not prolong his life in favor of letting nature take its course. Emmanuel joins Judy Woodruff to discuss his provocative essay published in The Atlantic, “Why I Hope to Die at 75.” Continue reading

  • impossiblechoice
    September 30, 2014  

    Special nursing home units are set up to care for people, both young and old, who depend on constant life support to survive, but whose families hope that someday they may recover. Joanne Faryon of inewsource, a San Diego-based journalism nonprofit, reports from California on the impossible choice that loved ones face, as well as the costs of keeping these patients alive. Continue reading

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