myanmar

  • May 17, 2015  

    Malaysian officials initiated emergency, high-level talks with neighboring countries Sunday, hoping to address the more than 5,000 refugees that have been stranded at sea as they try to escape ethnic persecution and poverty in Myanmar and Bangladesh. But none of the Southeast Asian countries are welcoming the refugees, even as food and water supplies aboard the boats dwindle. Aubrey Belford of Reuters joins Hari Sreenivasan via Skype from Koh Lipe, Thailand. Continue reading

  • May 15, 2015  

    Since November, an estimated 20,000 to 25,000 people have fled persecution in Myanmar and poverty in Bangladesh. Thousands are currently stranded at sea, some having been turned away from Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia. Many are from the Rohingya, a muslim minority targeted by the Myanmar government. Hari Sreenivasan talks to Sarnata Reynolds of Refugees International. Continue reading

  • March 10, 2015  

    In our news wrap Tuesday, the University of Oklahoma expelled two students for leading a racist chant at a fraternity event. The president of the school has said others may face discipline as well. Also, President Obama laid out a series of changes to the student loan system, calling for better treatment of Americans burdened with student debt and more transparency from lenders. Continue reading

  • March 10, 2015   BY  

    Protests in Myanmar took a violent turn on Tuesday after police beat students, monks and reporters and detained about 100 people demonstrating against an education law that has been criticized for curtailing academic freedoms. Continue reading

  • December 12, 2014   BY  

    WASHINGTON — Human rights advocates and some lawmakers say the United States is sending the wrong signal by opening the door for broader engagement with Myanmar’s widely criticized military just weeks after President Barack Obama assured opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi that closer ties weren’t going to happen soon. Continue reading

  • December 10, 2014  

    In northern Myanmar, there’s an epidemic of heroin addiction and HIV infection among workers who mine for jade. Some believe the government is encouraging the use of drugs as a weapon against their people. Hari Sreenivasan talks to Dan Levin of The New York Times about China’s role in the industry and how the epidemic spread. Continue reading

  • November 13, 2014  

    In our news wrap Thursday, Liberia’s president lifted a state of emergency that restricted citizen movement, citing progress against Ebola. More than half of the more than 5,000 people who have died from the disease have been from that country. Also, The New York Times reported that President Obama will issue an executive order on immigration, drawing fresh warnings from Republicans. Continue reading

  • November 13, 2014   BY  

    NAYPYITAW, Myanmar — President Barack Obama received a hero’s welcome two years ago during his historic visit to Myanmar, whose rapid rebirth after decades of repression was a source of hope for the region and beyond. Yet as he meets Thursday with President Thein Sein in the nation’s sparkling new capital, Obama is carrying a far grimmer message as he seeks to reverse a worrisome backslide in the country’s march toward a freer and fairer society. Continue reading

  • May 19, 2014  

    In the 1980s and ’90s, Kyaw Thu was one of Myanmar’s leading film stars, appearing in more than 200 movies. He was so popular that the military government cast him in several propaganda films. But when he turned down a role, it ended his acting career. Instead, he founded a service that provides funerals for those who can’t afford them. Jeffrey Brown tells the story of personal transformation. Continue reading

  • April 15, 2014  

    There is no urban landscape like Yangon in the world. Largely isolated from the rest of the world for decades, Myanmar’s capital city has been frozen in time, filled with temples and grand buildings from the colonial era. But as the country embraces a more open society, how will it manage to preserve its past while building its future? Chief arts correspondent Jeffrey Brown reports. Continue reading