NewsHour Poetry Series

  • September 11, 2012   BY Michael D. Mosettig  

    A worker in Utrecht, the Netherlands, hangs a poster of one of the parties taking part in Wednesday’s Dutch parliamentary elections. Photo by Jasper Juinen/Getty Images. Updated on Sept. 12: Germany’s Federal Constitutional Court on Wednesday gave the green light … Continue reading

  • September 11, 2012   BY Beth Garbitelli  

    Iraq War veteran Hugh Martin has won the first-ever Jeff Sharlet Memorial Award from The Iowa Review, the literary journal announced Tuesday. Martin, a poet and author who served in the Ohio Army National Guard from 2001 to 2007 and spent 11 months in Iraq, submitted a collection of poems about his war experience and his return to civilian life.
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  • September 10, 2012   BY Tom LeGro  

    Michael Robbins is the author of the collection of poems “Alien vs. Predator” (Penguin, 2012). His poems have appeared in several publications, including the New Yorker, Poetry, Harper’s and Boston Review. He reviews books for the London Review of Books and other publications, and music for The Daily and the Village Voice. He lives in Chicago.
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  • August 30, 2012   BY Paige Kollock  

    Ali, a Lebanese resident, who worries about sectarian violence in his home country if the Syrian regime falls. BEIRUT, Lebanon | The turmoil in Syria is impacting neighboring Lebanon in more ways than one. Besides terrifying some Lebanese residents about … Continue reading

  • August 27, 2012  

    Residents in parts of the Lebanese city of Tripoli are worried about stepping outside for fear they will get caught up in fighting between pro- and anti-Syrian factions. Continue reading

  • August 23, 2012  

    Independent estimates say 20,000 have died since the Syrian uprising began. Now, U.N. monitors have left, failing to stop the violence. Jeffrey Brown reports. Then Margaret Warner talks to the Guardian’s Ghaith Adbul-Ahad, who has been following Syrian rebels on the ground as they struggle to hold government troops at bay. Continue reading

  • August 20, 2012   BY Tom LeGro  

    Joseph Campana a poet, critic and scholar of Renaissance literature. He is the author of two collections of poetry, “The Book of Faces” (Graywolf, 2005) and “Natural Selections,” which won the 2011 Iowa Poetry Prize. He teaches Renaissance literature and creative writing at Rice University.
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  • August 15, 2012  

    The Syrian town of Azaz suffered government air strikes that reportedly left 30 dead. And residents insist that the bombs were targeting civilians, not rebel forces. Meanwhile, U.N. human rights monitors declared that both Syrian troops and rebels have committed war crimes. Independent Television News’ Jonathan Miller reports. Continue reading

  • August 15, 2012  

    The ongoing battle in Aleppo between Assad regime troops and the Syrian Free Army has left civilians caught in the crossfire. Margaret Warner talks to Amnesty International’s Scott Edwards and American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Susan Wolfinbarger on how satellites are documenting human rights abuse in Syria. Continue reading

  • August 8, 2012  

    While the government troops moved into the rebel-held Salaheddine district of Aleppo, thousands of Syrians continue to flee from the country, including to the first U.N refugee camp in Jordan. Judy Woodruff reports. Continue reading