oil boom

  • oilfieldoasis
    June 24, 2015  

    When Brendan Wegner went to work in North Dakota’s Bakken oil fields, his family had no idea it was so dangerous. On average, a worker dies every six weeks. On his first day on the rig, Wegner was killed by an explosion, and OSHA launched an investigation. Special correspondent Jennifer Gollan of Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting examines how employers avoid accountability. Continue reading

  • Empty railroad tank cars snake their way into a storage yard in Newark, Delaware, July 28, 2013. The cars will return to North Dakota's Bakken region to be loaded with crude oil for another trip to the refinery at Delaware City, Delaware. With a shortage of new pipeline capacity, oil producers have been using rail as an alternative, and in some cases it's the preferred mode. Photo by Curtis Tate/MCT via Getty Images
    April 23, 2014  

    The amount of oil being moved around the United States by rail has quadrupled since 2005. A string of explosive train derailments in the U.S. and Canada have prompted the National Transportation Safety Board to work with other agencies on improving the safety of the rail shipments. Judy Woodruff talks to Deborah Hersman, chair of the National Transportation Safety Board. Continue reading

  • December 20, 2012  

    Former North Dakota attorney general and the first female in that state elected to the Senate, Democratic Sen.-elect Heidi Heitkamp talks to Jeffrey Brown about how she might react as a legislator to the violent events in Newtown, Conn., her support for the Keystone Pipeline and what’s ahead for budget negotiations in Congress. Continue reading

  • September 27, 2012   BY Mike Fritz  

    The schools in Williston, N.D., are facing a set of unique challenges. A rapidly expanding oil boom has created widespread prosperity in the region, but it has also given rise to a whole host of problems. Continue reading

  • September 27, 2012  

    As people flock to Williston, N.D., for jobs in the booming oil industry, the public systems struggle to keep up, converting one-room school houses to accommodate the rapid rise in student enrollment. Like much of Williston’s infrastructure, there are financial hurdles to meet needs of teachers and students. Ray Suarez reports. Continue reading