overfishing

  • January 6, 2017  

    Off the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, there’s not much cod left, but there’s plenty of dogfish. It’s a creature most Americans have never heard of, much less consumed. Instead, Americans are eating imported tuna, salmon and shrimp, in a pattern that could wipe out the U.S. fishing industry. NPR News’ Allison Aubrey reports on a company that’s promoting seafood caught at home. Continue reading

  • August 28, 2015   BY  

    On Monday, the United States hosts the leaders of 20 nations at a conference on critical issues facing the Arctic. One topic at the conference in Anchorage, Alaska, is the potential for overfishing in the central Arctic Ocean. Continue reading

  • October 24, 2014   BY  

    While adult penguins can survive 21 days without food, baby chicks cannot. Under normal conditions, the chicks would be out of their nests and able to survive the fast. But sparse fish populations around the South African shore limit chick’s growth and keep them nesting when adults reach the critical point when they must molt. Continue reading

  • July 27, 2014  

    The president of the tiny Pacific island nation of Kiribati announced a ban on commercial fishing in the waters surrounding his country in order to protect the marine life that lives along the coral reefs that ring his country’s islands, most importantly tuna. Continue reading

  • June 26, 2014  

    Tonle Sap Lake is one of the most productive freshwater ecosystems in the world. But overfishing, climate change and plans to build a hydropower dams could threaten the animals that make their home in the body of water known as the beating heart of Cambodia. Hari Sreenivasan narrates a report in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting on efforts to track and maintain lake health. Continue reading

  • June 16, 2014   BY  

    President Anote Tong of the tiny Pacific Island nation of Kiribati, announced Monday the closure of a vast fishing ground known as the Phoenix Islands Protected Area. The area, which spans over 150,000 square miles of ocean — roughly the size of California — will become one of the world’s largest marine sanctuaries for tuna and other endangered species. Continue reading