Paul Solman

  • City workers walk past the Bank of England in the City of London, Britain, March 29, 2016.  REUTERS/Toby Melville/File Photo - RTX2HTPO
    July 7, 2016  

    The pound and European markets took big hits when the United Kingdom voted to leave the EU. Economics correspondent Paul Solman talks to Mervyn King, the former head of the Bank of England and the author of “The End of Alchemy,” who offers a longer view — and a less alarmed one — about what Brexit means for global banking and financial stability. Continue reading

  • Anti-government demonstrators hold placards reading "No Brexit" during a protest outside the parliament in Athens, Greece June 15, 2016. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis - RTX2GFHW
    June 17, 2016  

    With a British referendum looming over whether to leave the European Union, many in favor of staying cite cultural and altruistic reasons. But according to some, including Prime Minister David Cameron, Brexit would also have severe economic consequences, including massive trade revenue losses and brain drain driven by shifting job markets. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports. Continue reading

  • power3
    June 9, 2016  

    In the past, violence was the quickest route to establishing dominance. But today, people gain influence by advancing the welfare of others, according to Dacher Keltner. The more power people derive from helping others, however, the more likely they are to prioritize selfishness over altruism — leading to what Keltner calls a ‘power paradox.’ Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports.
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  • index
    April 14, 2016  

    At first glance, fiscal planning can seem more complex and time-consuming than it’s worth. But according to Professor Harold Pollack of the University of Chicago, you can fit all the financial advice you’ll ever really need on a single index card. Economics correspondent Paul Solman takes a look at Pollack’s ten easy tips for simple and sensible money management. Continue reading

  • Mar 17, 2016; Des Moines, IA, USA; Connecticut Huskies guard Rodney Purvis (44) shoots the ball against Colorado Buffaloes guard Dominique Collier (15) during the second half in the first round of the 2016 NCAA Tournament at Wells Fargo Arena. Mandatory Credit: Steven Branscombe-USA TODAY Sports - RTSAYI7
    March 17, 2016  

    March Madness means a huge payday for coaches, colleges, networks and advertisers — everyone except the athletes themselves. Although television rights for the NCAA tournament this year alone brought in nearly a billion dollars, the players won’t see a penny, and many are unhappy with the situation. Economics correspondent Paul Solman examines the cases for and against paying student athletes.
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  • How long will interest rates stay low hee haw song
    March 10, 2016  

    Money manager turned country crooner Merle Hazard has made a name for himself singing about fiscal policy. His latest tune considers whether the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates — and according to one of the world’s leading investment experts, it’s brilliant, especially since the nation’s economic future hinges on the central bank’s decision. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports.
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  • Maureen Sherry
    March 3, 2016  

    Wall Street has long been considered a men’s-only club — so what is it like for a woman there, when only 15 percent of traders are female? According to Maureen Sherry, a former Bear Stearns director turned author, the problem goes beyond frat-boy antics and sexual harassment. Economics correspondent Paul Solman talks to Sherry about how the glass ceiling is repelling women from Wall Street. Continue reading

  • ITALY - JANUARY 20:  Ancient painting of Florence. The burial place of Leonardo Da Vinci's Mona Lisa located in the Florence's former Convent of Saint Orsola now abandoned and derelict. An Italian art historian Giuseppe Pallanti found a death notice in the archives of a church in Florence that referred to "the wife of Francesco del Giocondo, deceased July 15, 1542, and buried at Sant'Orsola, where she spent her final days, at age 63." Lisa Gherardini, as Leonardo's model was called in real life, was the wife of Florentine tradesman Francesco del Giocondo. Sant'Orsola, now disused and in ruins, is near the San Lorenzo basilica at the heart of the Tuscan metropolis. Another researcher urged a search at the site for Lisa Gherardini's remains. "Thanks to modern techniques, scientists can determine her physical aspect, maybe even her face and thereby make an important contribution" to establishing her identity.  (Photo by Eric VANDEVILLE/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
    January 21, 2016  

    What kind of environment spawns genius? That’s the question Eric Weiner tackles in his latest book, “The Geography of Genius,” in which Weiner journeys around the world and through time, from Plato’s Athens to Leonardo da Vinci’s Florence, to find the secret ingredients behind some of the greatest minds in history, and what it means for America today. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports. Continue reading

  • The_First_Thanksgiving_cph_3g04961
    November 26, 2015  

    Four hundred years ago, a group of pilgrims founded a colony in Plymouth. But what did they hope to accomplish there, how did they live? Economics correspondent Paul Solman jumps back in time to interview some of these early settlers and find out how they made a living. Continue reading

  • Screen shot from NYC Starbucks part-time worker
    September 1, 2014  

    As employers seek more control over labor costs, the number of part-time jobs has soared in the post-great recession period. But increasingly erratic work schedules — an attempt to squeeze maximum efficiency from every part-timer — has taken a toll on the workers. Economics correspondent Paul Solman looks at some of the consequences. Continue reading

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