Paul Solman

  • A pothole is pictured on the street of Los Angeles, California February 12, 2016. An estimated 65 percent of U.S. roads are in poor condition, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation, with the transportation infrastructure system rated 12th in the World Economic Forum's 2014-2015 global competitiveness report. Picture taken February 12. To match Insight AUTOS-AUTONOMOUS/INFRASTRUCTURE   REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni - RTSCYJD
    December 1, 2016  

    In recent decades, American productivity growth has slowed. Yale University’s Jacob Hacker has a possible explanation: the country’s outdated and deteriorating infrastructure. Hacker, co-author of “American Amnesia,” argues the U.S. has forgotten the role government plays in engineering prosperity, and that public investment got us where we are today. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports. Continue reading

  • howard johnson
    November 24, 2016  

    Can you imagine life before restaurants? Or brunch? Or convenient roadside dining? In his new book, “Ten Restaurants That Changed America,” historian Paul Freedman chronicles the pioneering establishments that changed American food. Economics correspondent Paul Solman takes a tour with Freedman.
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  • Tom Barrack, CEO of Colony Capital, speaks at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 21, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni - RTSJ47J
    October 14, 2016  

    Billionaire Tom Barrack, who made his fortune as a real estate investor, is a long-standing business associate and friend of Donald Trump, and now he’s also an economic adviser and fundraiser to the Trump campaign. Economics correspondent Paul Solman sits down with Barrack to discuss why he sees the Republican presidential candidate as the right person to revive the economy. Continue reading

  • File photo of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump by Carlo Allegri/Reuters
    August 25, 2016  

    This year’s presidential election has emphasized the trio of trade, globalization and jobs. For the next three weeks, Making Sen$e’s Paul Solman will dive into the candidates’ perspectives on these issues. He starts with Donald Trump, whose trade rhetoric tends to focus on China. We speak with one of his economic advisers about “unfair trade practices” and China’s influence on the U.S. economy. Continue reading

  • City workers walk past the Bank of England in the City of London, Britain, March 29, 2016.  REUTERS/Toby Melville/File Photo - RTX2HTPO
    July 7, 2016  

    The pound and European markets took big hits when the United Kingdom voted to leave the EU. Economics correspondent Paul Solman talks to Mervyn King, the former head of the Bank of England and the author of “The End of Alchemy,” who offers a longer view — and a less alarmed one — about what Brexit means for global banking and financial stability. Continue reading

  • Anti-government demonstrators hold placards reading "No Brexit" during a protest outside the parliament in Athens, Greece June 15, 2016. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis - RTX2GFHW
    June 17, 2016  

    With a British referendum looming over whether to leave the European Union, many in favor of staying cite cultural and altruistic reasons. But according to some, including Prime Minister David Cameron, Brexit would also have severe economic consequences, including massive trade revenue losses and brain drain driven by shifting job markets. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports. Continue reading

  • power3
    June 9, 2016  

    In the past, violence was the quickest route to establishing dominance. But today, people gain influence by advancing the welfare of others, according to Dacher Keltner. The more power people derive from helping others, however, the more likely they are to prioritize selfishness over altruism — leading to what Keltner calls a ‘power paradox.’ Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports.
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  • index
    April 14, 2016  

    At first glance, fiscal planning can seem more complex and time-consuming than it’s worth. But according to Professor Harold Pollack of the University of Chicago, you can fit all the financial advice you’ll ever really need on a single index card. Economics correspondent Paul Solman takes a look at Pollack’s ten easy tips for simple and sensible money management. Continue reading

  • Mar 17, 2016; Des Moines, IA, USA; Connecticut Huskies guard Rodney Purvis (44) shoots the ball against Colorado Buffaloes guard Dominique Collier (15) during the second half in the first round of the 2016 NCAA Tournament at Wells Fargo Arena. Mandatory Credit: Steven Branscombe-USA TODAY Sports - RTSAYI7
    March 17, 2016  

    March Madness means a huge payday for coaches, colleges, networks and advertisers — everyone except the athletes themselves. Although television rights for the NCAA tournament this year alone brought in nearly a billion dollars, the players won’t see a penny, and many are unhappy with the situation. Economics correspondent Paul Solman examines the cases for and against paying student athletes.
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  • How long will interest rates stay low hee haw song
    March 10, 2016  

    Money manager turned country crooner Merle Hazard has made a name for himself singing about fiscal policy. His latest tune considers whether the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates — and according to one of the world’s leading investment experts, it’s brilliant, especially since the nation’s economic future hinges on the central bank’s decision. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports.
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