public health

  • ebola1
    September 16, 2014  

    The United States will offer 3,000 troops and financial help to health care systems in West Africa that are overwhelmed by Ebola. President Obama announced that U.S. forces will build new treatment facilities, airlift hundreds of thousands of home health kits and train and treat health care workers. Meanwhile, the WHO predicts that infections will double every three weeks. Judy Woodruff reports. Continue reading

  • A banner explains Ebola prevention measures and symptoms of the disease in Dolo's Town, east of Monrovia, Liberia in this Sept. 2 photo by Dominique Faget/AFP/Getty Images.
    September 3, 2014   BY Larisa Epatko 

    Despite world health agencies’ best efforts to clamp down on ever-increasing Ebola outbreaks, people in West Africa who are in the center of the virus’ path are finding it hard to get accurate information and proper medical care, United Nations officials who recently visited the region said Wednesday. Continue reading

  • GUINEA-WAFRICA-HEALTH-EPIDEMIC-EBOLA
    September 2, 2014  

    The international head of Doctors Without Borders has charged that many of the efforts to curtail the Ebola outbreak in West Africa have actually made it worse. Jeffrey Brown joins director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Tom Frieden, who just returned from surveying the situation in West Africa, to discuss the impediments to containing the disease, and the prospects of it spreading. Continue reading

  • drjoanneliu
    September 2, 2014  

    A public health official warned that “the window is closing” to keep the growing Ebola outbreak in West Africa from spreading to other regions. Meanwhile, another American doctor in Monrovia, Liberia, was reported to have tested positive for the virus. Jonathan Miller of Independent Television News reports on a chaotic scene in Monrovia Monday, involving a man who fled from a quarantine center. Continue reading

  • ebola
    August 29, 2014  

    The Ebola virus has now reached a fifth country. Officials announced a Guinean student in Senegal was confirmed to have the disease. Meanwhile, a new report traces the deadly outbreak to a funeral in Guinea near the Sierra Leone border. Hari Sreenivasan talks to Stephen Gire of Harvard University about his on-the-ground experience in Sierra Leone and the latest on how the virus has spread. Continue reading

  • rwanda-3
    May 29, 2014  

    The public health transformation in Rwanda is striking for those with memories of the massacre of nearly one million people 20 years ago. International aid groups were initially wary about getting involved, but Rwanda took ownership of its own development and built a new health care system. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro explores how they’ve worked to overcome a shortage of doctors. Continue reading

  • Mexico2
    NEWSHOUR WEEKEND
    May 25, 2014  

    With obesity levels rivaling those seen in the United States, Mexico has launched a rigorous campaign to combat the epidemic, including taxes on sugary drinks and other high-calorie snack foods. How well is that strategy is working — and what lessons can U.S. policy makers learn from their Mexican counterparts? Continue reading

  • heroin2
    February 3, 2014  

    Heroin is chemically almost identical to prescription painkillers. But the illegal drug is more dangerous and much cheaper than regulated opiates. Jeffrey Brown talks to National Drug Control Policy director R. Gil Kerlikowske and Los Angeles Times reporter Sam Quinones about why heroin use in America has doubled since 2007 and the deadly consequences for users and addicts.
    Continue reading

  • HEROIN_CRISIS__vermont_monitor
    January 9, 2014  

    Gov. Peter Shumlin devoted his entire State of the State address to a "full-blown heroin crisis" ravaging Vermont. Shumlin joins Judy Woodruff to discuss his shift in focus on the issue of opiate addiction and Ryan Grim of the Huffington Post offers context on why heroin has made a major comeback in the United States. Continue reading

  • Malakwal City
    December 30, 2013  

    Seeds are big business in Hawaii, where large biotech companies develop genetically modified crops. Megan Thompson reports on a battle being waged on the island of Kauai by residents who say growing practices like pesticide use are hazardous to public health. Continue reading

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