race relations

  • teach1
    January 6, 2017  

    Why are there so few black male teachers? Chris Emdin of Columbia University suggests that a cycle of failure haunts students and their teachers. Students act out, so teachers tighten the rules; more restrictions combined with dull and irrelevant curricula cause students to fail, and teachers quit — thinking it’s their fault. Emdin raps his Humble Opinion on why the system needs to be changed. Continue reading

  • President Barack Obama in the Oval Office on his first day in office in 2009. Photo by Pete Souza/White House
    December 21, 2016  

    The Atlantic’s Ta-Nehisi Coates has criticized President Obama’s policies toward black Americans. Perhaps for that reason, he was invited to discuss such issues with Mr. Obama several times throughout the president’s second term. As part of a collaboration with The Atlantic, Coates speaks with Judy Woodruff about his latest Atlantic cover story, which considers Mr. Obama’s legacy and rare optimism through a racial lens. Continue reading

  • prison2
    December 21, 2016  

    In September 1971, Attica Correctional Facility in upstate New York became the site of a bloody uprising that would shock the nation. Over several days, some 1,300 inmates seized parts of the prison, demanding better living conditions. Heather Ann Thompson documents the untold story in her new book, “Blood in the Water,” and joins Jeffrey Brown to discuss the truth about the riot’s violent end. Continue reading

  • Clint Smith is the author of "Counting Descent" published in September 2016.  Photo by Elnatan Melaku.
    December 13, 2016   BY  

    Clinton Smith’s debut collection of poetry, “Counting Descent”, examines what it means to grow up Black in America. Smith recounts moments from childhood when Black lives were celebrated and juxtaposes them with incidents that have become all too common in the lives of young Black men. Continue reading

  • Surrounded by family and family attorneys, Anthony Scott speaks at a press conference after a hung jury was announced in the trial of former North Charleston police officer Michael Slager outside the Charleston County Courthouse in Charleston, South Carolina December 5, 2016. REUTERS/Randall Hill - RTSUT9V
    December 5, 2016  

    In our news wrap Monday, a South Carolina judge declared a mistrial in a police killing after the jury deadlocked. North Charleston officer Michael Slager was charged with murdering an unarmed black man, Walter Scott, as he ran from a traffic stop. Also, Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi plans to resign after his constitutional referendum failed, succumbing to the populist wave sweeping Europe. Continue reading

  • Keith Scott looks over to police with hands by his sides just before he was shot four times by Charlotte police in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S. in this September 20, 2016 still image from video released by Charlotte police.  Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department/Handout via Reuters/File Photo  ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY - RTSU17H
    November 30, 2016  

    In our news wrap Wednesday, the North Carolina police officer who fatally shot Keith Lamont Scott in September will not face criminal charges. The prosecutor said there was evidence that Scott, a black man, was holding a gun and ignored repeated requests to disarm. Also, the death toll from wildfires in Tennessee’s Great Smoky Mountains rose to seven; dozens more have been injured. Continue reading

  • Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL), an advisor to U.S. President Elect Donald Trump, speaks to members of the Media in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York. Photo by Mike Segar/Reuters
    November 18, 2016  

    For attorney general, President-elect Donald Trump selected an early supporter: the junior senator from Alabama, Jeff Sessions. Sessions has served as a U.S. attorney and Alabama’s attorney general, but he was denied a federal judgeship in 1986 based on controversial race-related remarks. John Yang reports and Judy Woodruff speaks with NPR’s Carrie Johnson for more on the polemical pick. Continue reading

  • Photo of a rally in Johnstown, Pennsylvania by Jonathan Ernst/Reuters
    November 4, 2016  

    In 2012, Mitt Romney received zero votes in inner-city Philadelphia. Some Republicans believed such an extreme result indicated fraudulent voting behavior, and this election season, Donald Trump and his supporters have revived that hypothesis. William Brangham speaks with officials in Pennsylvania for analysis of the 2012 data and explores what motivations might lie behind fraud concerns. Continue reading

  • moonlight1
    November 4, 2016  

    Based on a true story, the new movie “Moonlight” follows Chiron, a boy growing up black, gay and poor in 1980s Miami. The film documents Chiron’s identity struggle in three acts, featuring a different actor for each. It’s a landscape director Barry Jenkins knows well — he grew up in the same neighborhood around that time. Jeffrey Brown speaks with Jenkins and screenwriter Tarell Alvin McCraney. Continue reading

  • Author Paul Beatty poses for photographs during a photo-call in London. The author is the first American to win the prize in the award's 48-year history. Photo by Peter Nicholls/Reuters
    October 25, 2016   BY  

    Beatty is the first American ever to win the award in its 48-year history. Continue reading

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