racism

  • Social media site, Snapchat, is yet again under fire for debuting a filter many users called racist. Photo by Eric Thayer/Reuters
    August 11, 2016   BY  

    The popular social network is facing its second controversy in just four months over a filter some say is racist against Asians. Continue reading

  • File photo of voting booths by Scott Olson/Getty Images
    July 29, 2016  

    A federal appeals court has struck North Carolina’s stringent voting rules that, among other things, required voters to show I.D. before voting. “The new provisions target African Americans with almost surgical precision,” the judges said. The Justice Department and the NAACP had sued the state’s legislature. William Brangham talks with Kareem Crayton, Professor of Law at Vanderbilt University. Continue reading

  • Senator Tim Scott (R-SC) speaks with reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington March 8, 2016.      REUTERS/Joshua Roberts - RTS9WAP
    July 14, 2016  

    In our NewsHour Shares moment of the day, Sen. Tim Scott, a black Republican from South Carolina, gave a powerful — and revealing — speech Wednesday on how even in the Capitol, relations between African-Americans and cops are strained. He knows, he says, because he too has felt the sting of disrespect and suspicion. He described an incident from just last year and said there have been others. Continue reading

  • Demonstrators chant during a "Black Lives Matter" protest in front of the Governor's Mansion in St. Paul, Minnesota, U.S., July 7, 2016. A Minneapolis area police officer fatally shot Philando Castile during a traffic stop on Wednesday. REUTERS/Eric Miller   - RTX2K75G
    July 7, 2016  

    A police officer shot 32-year-old Philando Castile in his car Wednesday after pulling him over for a broken tail light. The aftermath was filmed and broadcast on Facebook by Castile’s girlfriend, who explained that he had been legally carrying a gun. His death, the second of a black man killed by police in as many days, prompted grief and protest. Hari Sreenivasan reports. Continue reading

  • Lakeith Howard demonstrates outside the Triple S Food Mart where Alton Sterling was shot dead by police in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Photo by Jonathan Bachman/Reuters
    July 7, 2016  

    Why did a police officer use lethal force against Philando Castile during a routine traffic stop in Minnesota? Hari Sreenivasan talks to Jelani Cobb of The New Yorker, David Klinger of the University of Missouri-St. Louis and Issie Lapowsky of Wired discuss the growing impact of social media in police confrontations, police training in implicit bias and whether video evidence is changing the conversation. Continue reading

  • Demonstrators take part in a protest aimed at showing London's solidarity with the European Union following the recent EU referendum, inTrafalgar Square, central London, Britain June 28, 2016.       REUTERS/Dylan Martinez - RTX2IQ57
    July 1, 2016  

    Immigrants and minorities in post-Brexit Britain are living in fear, reporting an uptick in xenophobic attacks that some are blaming on the immigrant scapegoating of the Leave movement. In Hammersmith, a Polish war memorial and a cultural center were vandalized and anti-Muslim pamphlets are making the rounds in Birmingham, where a Halal butcher was firebombed. Hari Sreenivasan reports from London. Continue reading

  • Freedom school student Cynthia Perteet (left) and volunteer Beth More (right) in Hattiesburg, Mississippi during Freedom Summer, 1964.  More was a teacher in the Freedom School hosted by Mt. Zion Baptist Church.  Photo by Herbert Randall from Herbert Randall Freedom Summer Photographs collection, McCain Library and Archives, The University Southern Mississippi.
    June 22, 2016  

    Last month, a Mississippi judge ordered the state’s public schools to desegregate, illuminating the ongoing struggle to comply with the Supreme Court’s 1954 Brown v. Board of Education ruling. Special correspondent Charlayne Hunter-Gault talks to Maureen Costello of the Southern Poverty Law Center for insight into how Southern schools can move race relations forward. Continue reading

  • poet
    June 17, 2016  

    Friday saw the first anniversary of the shooting at Charleston’s Emanuel AME Church, where alleged white supremacist Dylann Roof killed nine black churchgoers. Among those who struggled to come to terms with the tragedy were two local poets, musician and web designer Marcus Amaker and South Carolina Poet Laureate Marjory Wentworth, who share some of their reflections in verse. Continue reading

  • Oakland Police Department officer Huy Nguyen wears a Portable Digital Recording Device, a body camera, designed to record both audio and video in the field, at the police headquarters in Oakland, California April 14, 2015. OPD was one of the first large organizations in the country to utilize the device, which documents officers actions and community interactions with police.  REUTERS/Robert Galbraith - RTR4XCJP
    June 15, 2016  

    The Oakland police department’s history of misconduct — particularly involving African-Americans — has made it the subject of federal oversight for 13 years. Wednesday, Stanford researchers released the results of a two-year-long study into the department, confirming that Oakland officers exhibit significant racial biases in their day-to-day work. Special correspondent Jackie Judd reports. Continue reading

  • Relatives and friends gathered to remember Walter Scott, at Live Oak Memorial Gardens in Charleston, South Carolina, April 4, 2016. REUTERS/Randal Hill - RTSDKRC
    June 14, 2016  

    A year ago this week, nine black churchgoers were gunned down inside Charleston’s historic Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church by alleged white supremacist Dylan Roof, who faces the death penalty if convicted. Among those slain was the church’s pastor, the Rev. Clementa Pinckney. Last winter, the Rev. Betty Deas took over as pastor, and joins Jeffrey Brown to reflect on the tragedy and its aftermath.
    Continue reading

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