students

  • October 8, 2013  

    Forty-five New York City public high school students are taking big strides toward achieving their dreams by learning how to work together on creating fully functional, original cellphone apps with business plans. John Tulenko of Learning Matters reports on how one summer program trains kids to be high-tech entrepreneurs. Continue reading

  • NEWSHOUR WEEKEND
    September 28, 2013  

    On American Graduate Day, community organizations, celebrities and educators acknowledge their commitment to keeping at-risk students in school. PBS NewsHour’s Student Reporting Labs participated by asking students around the country about their most pressing issues in education. Continue reading

  • September 26, 2013  

    Legally, unpaid interns can’t displace regular paid workers, doing real work for no pay. So why have unpaid internships have become so pervasive? Economics correspondent Paul Solman talks to some former interns frustrated with not being paid for work duties that went beyond learning, as well as others who found positive values. Continue reading

  • September 23, 2013  

    What makes for educational success for kids around the world — and how can we apply that in the U.S.? Jeffrey Brown speaks with Amanda Ripley, author of "The Smartest Kids in the World: And How They Got That Way," on her conclusions after studying the diverse academic environments of Poland, Finland and South Korea. Continue reading

  • September 3, 2013  

    In Oakland, Calif., some programs are working to better help African-American boys graduate from high school and improve their social and academic outcomes. Special correspondent Joshua Johnson of KQED reports on the push to change the way these students think about school by offering them more support. Continue reading

  • August 21, 2013  

    Students at the Albany Park Theatre Project in Chicago research, write and perform plays about their own communities, tackling tough issues like immigration, poverty and race while learning about theater in an area where extracurricular activities are few and far between. Jeffrey Brown reports. Continue reading

  • August 19, 2013  

    In Providence, R.I., the Summer Scholars Program has reinvented summer school by taking lower income students out of the classroom and putting them "into the field." John Merrow reports on how the new approach gets students to practice skills they struggled with during the past year and prevent additional learning loss for fall. Continue reading

  • July 18, 2013  

    In India, at least 23 children died after eating school lunches that may have been contaminated by insecticide. Judy Woodruff talks to Arvind Subramanian of the Peterson Institute for International Economics about the heartache for the victims’ parents and the lack of government accountability when calamities occur. Continue reading

  • June 27, 2013  

    Starting next year, new federal rules from the U.S. Department of Agriculture will regulate the kinds of food and beverages sold at schools in order to lower the amount of fat, salt and sugar in kids’ diets. Ray Suarez gets details on the new rules from Margo Wootan of the Center for Science in the Public Interest. Continue reading

  • April 2, 2013  

    Jeffrey Brown talks with Gerald Stern, one of America’s most acclaimed poets. At 87, Stern received the Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry from the Library of Congress for his collection, "Early Collected Poems: 1965-1992." Stern reflects on his working class upbringing and 70 years of writing verse. Continue reading