The Atlantic

  • Digital addictions are not official mental disorders. But researchers see the same patterns in digital addictions as in other substance abuse. Photo by Kar Tr via Adobe
    August 7, 2017  

    The promise of social media is instant human connection. But for many teens, greater use of social media mans a far greater sense of isolation, according to an increasing body of evidence. William Brangham speaks with Jean Twenge, author of “iGen” and a new article in The Atlantic, about the ways smartphones are affecting an entire generation’s mental health.
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  • May 23, 2017   BY , and  

    We know it’s easy to overlook stories not involving Trump, Comey or Russia. With that in mind, we give you five important stories that you may have missed, including an Atlantic piece on a modern-day slave and the state of Maine’s booming lobster harvest. Continue reading

  • January 30, 2017  

    Whether you’re killing time in line at Starbucks or scrolling through an endless meme stream on Twitter, your smartphone is trying to seduce you. Former Google employee Tristan Harris felt something needed to be done to combat tech designers’ relentless efforts to influence our behavior. Special correspondent Cat Wise talks to Harris as part of a collaboration with The Atlantic. Continue reading

  • January 24, 2017  

    Can an ex-president have fun? Atlantic writer Barbara Bradley Hagerty examined the lives of modern presidents to see how they fared in the real world after leaving office in middle age. As part of a collaboration with The Atlantic, Hagerty tells Judy Woodruff that Jimmy Carter was the trailblazer, Bill Clinton the moneymaker, George W. Bush the laid-back painter. So what’s next for Barack Obama? Continue reading

  • December 21, 2016  

    The Atlantic’s Ta-Nehisi Coates has criticized President Obama’s policies toward black Americans. Perhaps for that reason, he was invited to discuss such issues with Mr. Obama several times throughout the president’s second term. As part of a collaboration with The Atlantic, Coates speaks with Judy Woodruff about his latest Atlantic cover story, which considers Mr. Obama’s legacy and rare optimism through a racial lens. Continue reading

  • November 21, 2016  

    At 93, Henry Kissinger is still one of the most influential — and controversial — foreign policy figures in America, says Jeffrey Goldberg, Atlantic editor-in-chief. The former secretary of state recently joined Goldberg for a conversation about the Obama legacy, the president-elect and more. Judy Woodruff reports as part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour. Continue reading

  • November 1, 2016  

    Political consultants have obtained an exalted status in contemporary politics. But for their sky-high fees, and in an era when Donald Trump won his party’s nomination without the help of experienced campaigners, what do consultants really offer a candidate? As part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour, Judy Woodruff interviews journalist Molly Ball about what she found. Continue reading

  • September 19, 2016  

    Has our political system gone crazy? Jonathan Rauch thinks so. In a recent piece for the Atlantic, Rauch explores what he calls “chaos syndrome” in Washington: government stagnation, he argues, is resulting from politicians’ inability to compromise, combined with constant calls for transparency. Judy Woodruff speaks with Rauch about the history of American politics and where they stand today. Continue reading

  • August 15, 2016  

    As we approach the 15th anniversary of 9/11, we ponder the question: Is America safer now from terrorism than it was on that fateful day? Steven Brill spent the last year evaluating what has changed, including tightened airline security policies, but also how the country returned to “politics as usual.” He speaks with Judy Woodruff about his findings — and his recommendations. Continue reading

  • June 1, 2016  

    Could you come up with $2,000 in 30 days if you had to? As many as 40 percent of American families can’t, despite the improving economy. Among them is Neal Gabler, who is frequently broke despite his successful career as a writer. As part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour, Judy Woodruff looks at why Gabler and so many other Americans are struggling with savings. Continue reading

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