The Atlantic

  • safer
    August 15, 2016  

    As we approach the 15th anniversary of 9/11, we ponder the question: Is America safer now from terrorism than it was on that fateful day? Steven Brill spent the last year evaluating what has changed, including tightened airline security policies, but also how the country returned to “politics as usual.” He speaks with Judy Woodruff about his findings — and his recommendations. Continue reading

  • neil
    June 1, 2016  

    Could you come up with $2,000 in 30 days if you had to? As many as 40 percent of American families can’t, despite the improving economy. Among them is Neal Gabler, who is frequently broke despite his successful career as a writer. As part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour, Judy Woodruff looks at why Gabler and so many other Americans are struggling with savings. Continue reading

  • buffett3
    May 2, 2016  

    Howard Buffett, son of billionaire Warren Buffett, has an ambitious life goal: ending world hunger. As a farmer and philanthropist, his focus is on reviving African agriculture, which has suffered massive production failures. In collaboration with The Atlantic, Judy Woodruff charts Buffett’s efforts to boost food security for billions. Continue reading

  • foreign policy
    March 10, 2016  

    What is President Obama’s real foreign policy legacy? Through a series of interviews with the commander in chief, Jeffrey Goldberg of the Atlantic set out to determine an answer — one divorced from the partisan rhetoric that tends to dominate such discussions. As part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour, Judy Woodruff joins Goldberg to find out what he learned.
    Continue reading

  • atlantic
    March 8, 2016  

    It’s called flyover country — low-profile parts of the U.S. the news media often forgets. But to husband-and-wife journalists James and Deborah Fallows, these areas are home to ‘cities that work,’ thriving communities that buck this election’s narrative of national pessimism. As part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour, Judy Woodruff joins the couple to learn more. Continue reading

  • A picture of U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump hangs outside a house in West Des Moines, Iowa, United States, January 15, 2016. Picture taken January 15, 2016.    REUTERS/Jim Young        TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY      - RTX2502Y
    February 1, 2016  

    Is the Republican party revolting against itself? As part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour, Judy Woodruff leads a discussion with David Frum and others on the struggle between establishment and antiestablishment factions in the GOP, and what it means for the 2016 race. Continue reading

  • File photo of voters by Getty Images
    December 9, 2015  

    Early polling often doesn’t reflect who goes on to become president (think Howard Dean or Newt Gingrich). These days pollsters acknowledge they are wrestling with a sea change in polling methods that’s making it harder to collect a sample opinion of Americans. Judy Woodruff reports as part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour. Continue reading

  • U.S. President Barack Obama listens as Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks during their news conference in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing November 12, 2014. Obama will travel to Myanmar and Australia as part of a week-long trip to Asia to attend summits. 
REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS) - RTR4DSZ0
    June 3, 2015  

    China is on track to eclipse the U.S. as the world’s largest economy by 2016, and it hasn’t been shy about flexing military muscle. Henry Paulson and Bob Rubin, former treasury secretaries from different parties, say the U.S. and China need to correct their relationship in order to ensure global stability. Judy Woodruff reports as part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour. Continue reading

  • A Starbucks cafe is seen in Los Angeles
    May 6, 2015  

    More than ever, the challenge for low-income students is not getting into college, but finishing. Last year, employees of the coffee chain Starbucks were given the chance to benefit from a unique financial aid: if they work at least 20 hours a week, they are eligible for a four-year free education. Judy Woodruff reports as part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour. Continue reading

  • michele roberts basketball pbs newshour the atlantic  2
    April 29, 2015  

    Michele Roberts, the first woman ever to run a professional sports union in North America, is on top of what is still very much a man’s world. She’ll face negotiations for a new collective bargaining agreement with NBA team owners in 2017. As part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour, Judy Woodruff interviews Roberts about her journey and the coming challenge. Continue reading

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