The Atlantic

  • Former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger arrives for a memorial service for late Social Democratic senior politician Egon Bahr at St. Mary's Church in Berlin, Germany, September 17, 2015. Egon Bahr, an eminent German Social Democrat who with late Chancellor Willy Brandt forged a policy of rapprochement with Communist Eastern Europe known as "Ostpolitik" during the Cold War, died at the age of 93 on August 20, 2015. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch - RTS1J4M
    November 21, 2016  

    At 93, Henry Kissinger is still one of the most influential — and controversial — foreign policy figures in America, says Jeffrey Goldberg, Atlantic editor-in-chief. The former secretary of state recently joined Goldberg for a conversation about the Obama legacy, the president-elect and more. Judy Woodruff reports as part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour. Continue reading

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    November 1, 2016  

    Political consultants have obtained an exalted status in contemporary politics. But for their sky-high fees, and in an era when Donald Trump won his party’s nomination without the help of experienced campaigners, what do consultants really offer a candidate? As part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour, Judy Woodruff interviews journalist Molly Ball about what she found. Continue reading

  • A woman holds up a t-shirt before Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump held a campaign event at the new Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., U.S., September 16, 2016.  REUTERS/Mike Segar - RTSO2SR
    September 19, 2016  

    Has our political system gone crazy? Jonathan Rauch thinks so. In a recent piece for the Atlantic, Rauch explores what he calls “chaos syndrome” in Washington: government stagnation, he argues, is resulting from politicians’ inability to compromise, combined with constant calls for transparency. Judy Woodruff speaks with Rauch about the history of American politics and where they stand today. Continue reading

  • safer
    August 15, 2016  

    As we approach the 15th anniversary of 9/11, we ponder the question: Is America safer now from terrorism than it was on that fateful day? Steven Brill spent the last year evaluating what has changed, including tightened airline security policies, but also how the country returned to “politics as usual.” He speaks with Judy Woodruff about his findings — and his recommendations. Continue reading

  • neil
    June 1, 2016  

    Could you come up with $2,000 in 30 days if you had to? As many as 40 percent of American families can’t, despite the improving economy. Among them is Neal Gabler, who is frequently broke despite his successful career as a writer. As part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour, Judy Woodruff looks at why Gabler and so many other Americans are struggling with savings. Continue reading

  • buffett3
    May 2, 2016  

    Howard Buffett, son of billionaire Warren Buffett, has an ambitious life goal: ending world hunger. As a farmer and philanthropist, his focus is on reviving African agriculture, which has suffered massive production failures. In collaboration with The Atlantic, Judy Woodruff charts Buffett’s efforts to boost food security for billions. Continue reading

  • foreign policy
    March 10, 2016  

    What is President Obama’s real foreign policy legacy? Through a series of interviews with the commander in chief, Jeffrey Goldberg of the Atlantic set out to determine an answer — one divorced from the partisan rhetoric that tends to dominate such discussions. As part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour, Judy Woodruff joins Goldberg to find out what he learned.
    Continue reading

  • atlantic
    March 8, 2016  

    It’s called flyover country — low-profile parts of the U.S. the news media often forgets. But to husband-and-wife journalists James and Deborah Fallows, these areas are home to ‘cities that work,’ thriving communities that buck this election’s narrative of national pessimism. As part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour, Judy Woodruff joins the couple to learn more. Continue reading

  • A picture of U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump hangs outside a house in West Des Moines, Iowa, United States, January 15, 2016. Picture taken January 15, 2016.    REUTERS/Jim Young        TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY      - RTX2502Y
    February 1, 2016  

    Is the Republican party revolting against itself? As part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour, Judy Woodruff leads a discussion with David Frum and others on the struggle between establishment and antiestablishment factions in the GOP, and what it means for the 2016 race. Continue reading

  • File photo of voters by Getty Images
    December 9, 2015  

    Early polling often doesn’t reflect who goes on to become president (think Howard Dean or Newt Gingrich). These days pollsters acknowledge they are wrestling with a sea change in polling methods that’s making it harder to collect a sample opinion of Americans. Judy Woodruff reports as part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour. Continue reading

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