third party candidates

  • WASHINGTON, :  Consumer advocate Ralph Nader steps from the podium following the announcement for his bid for the Green Party nomination for the US presidency 21 February, 2000 in Washington, DC.  Nader announced he will run on issues including the corporate financing of elections and excessive disparities of wealth. The Green Party will hold their nominating convention in Denver in June 2000.   AFP PHOTO/Chris KLEPONISAFP PHOTO AFP/CHRIS KLEPONIS/CK/DEC (Photo credit should read CHRIS KLEPONIS/AFP/Getty Images)
    September 25, 2016   BY  

    In an election driven by voter frustration with the political establishment, Gary Johnson and Jill Stein could do reasonably well in November — and potentially play a spoiler role in the election. The prospect of a solid showing this year highlights one of the most confounding aspects of American politics: the electorate’s inconsistent, back-and-forth appetite for third-party candidates. Continue reading

  • johnson2
    September 21, 2016  

    Former governor and Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson is polling the highest of third-party candidates, although he did not qualify for the upcoming first debate. He speaks with Gwen Ifill about what he sees as unfair election polling, how he would do away with the “added layer of bureaucracy” that is the Department of Homeland Security and the Black Lives Matter movement. Continue reading

  • Colorado
    September 12, 2016  

    In most elections, Colorado has been a key battleground state. But this season, Hillary Clinton is polling far ahead of Donald Trump. Gwen Ifill speaks with voters in one of the state’s most conservative counties, home to five military installations and where Mitt Romney was a slam dunk in 2012. Now, some conservatives are turning to third-party candidates and even to the Democratic opposition. Continue reading

  • October 24, 2012  

    Four alternative candidates to Mitt Romney and President Obama — Gary Johnson, Jill Stein, Virgil Goode and Rocky Anderson — met in Chicago for a third party debate to discuss everything from halting the war on drugs to reducing military spending to curbing the influence of money in politics. Kwame Holman reports. Continue reading