• Demonstrators hold signs during demonstrations asking for higher wages in the Manhattan borough of New York
    April 15, 2015  

    Low-wage workers around the nation went out in protest on April 15, demanding a minimum wage of $15 an hour. A few big corporations have begun raising their pay, but some critics say a major hike would hurt employers and kill jobs. Gwen Ifill gets debate from Steve Caldeira of the International Franchise Association and Tsedeye Gebreselassie of the National Employment Law Project. Continue reading

  • lincolnslegacy
    April 15, 2015  

    President Abraham Lincoln died 150 years ago, just days after Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox, ending the Civil War after four years. To discuss the lasting effects of both events, Jeffrey Brown talks to Martha Hodes, author of “Mourning Lincoln,” James McPherson, author of “The War That Forged a Nation,” and Isabel Wilkerson, author of “The Warmth of Other Suns.” Continue reading

  • robertelee
    February 16, 2015  

    Robert E. Lee was the son of a Revolutionary War hero who was a trusted aide to George Washington. In 1861, after 25 years in the U.S. Army, Lee turned down an offer to command Union forces in the Civil War. That decision is the subject of a new book, “The Man Who Would Not Be Washington.” Judy Woodruff talks to author Jonathan Horn about choices that change history. Continue reading

  • February 15, 2014   BY Kayla Ruble 

    PBS NewsHour is following the news of the day, from Chattanooga to Lebanon. Continue reading

  • October 23, 2013  

    The city of Detroit filed for bankruptcy in July, and now it must prove to a judge that the conditions necessitate that protection. But some pension funds, unions and retirees are fighting the filing. Jeffrey Brown gets an update from Matthew Dolan of The Wall Street Journal on Detroit’s finances. Continue reading

  • October 21, 2013  

    In our news wrap Monday, 400,000 Bay Area Rapid Transit riders will face clogged commutes this week after more than 2,000 BART employees walked off the job over pay raises and workplace rules. Also, the Supreme Court will hear a case considering how states decide who is mentally fit to face the death penalty. Continue reading

  • December 31, 2012  

    Issued by President Lincoln on Jan. 1, 1863, the Emancipation Proclamation is one of the defining documents of American democracy and is rarely available for public viewing. Ray Suarez talks to Annette Gordon-Reed of Harvard University about the importance of this artifact. Continue reading

  • June 20, 2012  

    As local governments roll back employee pensions and benefits, the nation’s largest public labor union is preparing for an internal leadership battle that could shape its external mission. Gwen Ifill analyzes the stakes with Steven Greenhouse of the New York Times and Alec MacGillis of the New Republic. Continue reading

  • November 9, 2011  

    Voters around the country went to the polls on Tuesday to answer some critical ballot questions. Judy Woodruff examines the results in Ohio, where voters overturned a law curbing union rights, with Ohio Public Radio’s Karen Kasler. Continue reading

  • October 14, 2011  

    A controversial new Ohio law aimed at restricting the collective-bargaining rights of 360,000 unionized public employees has led to a major political fight and a voter referendum in this battleground state. Gwen Ifill reports on the issue that has both sides spending millions to mobilize their voters for an off-year election. Continue reading

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