water contamination

  • water
    August 13, 2014  

    Recent cases of water contamination, including an algae bloom in Lake Erie and a chemical leak in West Virginia, has stirred new worries about the state of our drinking water. Hari Sreenivasan talks to David Beckman of the Pisces Foundation, who recently wrote an op-ed in The New York Times about drinking water threats. Continue reading

  • Photo by Time Sloan/AFP/Getty Images
    June 9, 2014   BY Sam Hananel, Associated Press 

    WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court ruled Monday that a group of homeowners in North Carolina can’t sue a company that contaminated their drinking water decades ago because a state deadline has lapsed, a decision that could prevent thousands of other property owners in similar cases from recovering damages after being exposed to toxic waste.

    In a 7-2 decision, the justices said state law strictly bars any lawsuit brought more than 10 years after the contamination occurred — even if residents did not realize their water was polluted until years later.

    The high court reversed a lower court ruling that said federal environmental laws should trump the state law and allow the lawsuit against electronics manufacturer CTS Corp. to proceed. Continue reading

  • jetfuel_09
    May 13, 2014  

    At Kirtland Air Force Base on the outskirts of Albuquerque, New Mexico, a hole in a pipeline allowed fuel containing toxic chemicals to ooze into the soil, undetected for more than four decades. Special correspondent Kathleen McCleery reports on the efforts to clean up the leak, and the serious concerns that remain about drinking water contamination. Continue reading

  • Water Supply Threaten In Charleston Community Of Over 300,000 After Chemical Leak
    April 16, 2014  

    Three months ago, a storage tank leaked up to 10,000 gallons of the chemical MCHM in Charleston, W.Va., where more than 300,000 people were exposed to one of the worst cases of drinking water contamination in U.S. history. To examine the regulations that have been passed in its wake, Judy Woodruff talks to Evan Osnos of The New Yorker and Ashton Marra of West Virginia Public Broadcasting. Continue reading