Arts

  • July 29, 1996  

    Richard Rodriguez of the Pacific News Service considers America’s changing cultural heritage. Continue reading

  • July 24, 1996  

    Welfare reform is considered a major issue with the voters. The Senate joined the House in passing historic legislation to end the federal guarantee to welfare and return most assistance programs to the states. A panel debate on how the President should respond to this move by Congress, follows a backgrounder by Kwame Holman. Continue reading

  • July 24, 1996  

    South Africa’s Deputy President Thabo Mbeki is in Washington, D.C. to discuss the economic future of his country with the White House. The man Nelson Mandella says he wants to succeed him as president in 1999, discusses race relations and living conditions with Charlayne Hunter-Gault. Continue reading

  • July 18, 1996  

    Olympic historian Mark McDonald says today’s women swimmers could easily break John Weissmuller’s 1924 or 1928 records. Why? Better nutrition, equipment, coaching, and the luxury of working at it full time. He speaks with David Gergen. Continue reading

  • July 12, 1996  

    Chinese art treasures from the “Imperial Collection” – the ancient emperors’ personal stash collected over centuries and shown only sparingly, has left Taiwan and is now touring America. Continue reading

  • July 10, 1996  

    Essayist Anne Taylor Fleming considers men who cry in public, and women who don’t. Continue reading

  • July 4, 1996  

    On this 4th of July, Roger Rosenblatt takes a look at Americans and independence. Continue reading

  • July 2, 1996  

    Civil rights, business law, free speech issues and political campaign spending — the Supreme Court heard it all this year. Elizabeth Farnsworth reviews the cases and the decisions. Continue reading

  • July 1, 1996  

    Tom Bearden reports from Dallas, where a federal judge recently ordered public housing to be built in the mostly white, affluent suburbs of the city. Continue reading

  • July 1, 1996  

    The Supreme Court today decided not to hear a case against the University of Texas Law School that challenged that school’s race-based admission policy. Continue reading