Arts

  • March 3, 1997  

    It might be 2700 years old, but The Odyssey is a story that still enthralls readers today. A recent translation by Princeton Professor Robert Fagles is into its third printing only two months after publication. Professor Fagles talks to Elizabeth Farnsworth about the lasting appeal of this ancient Greek tale. Continue reading

  • February 28, 1997  

    After suggestions that some Swiss banks were holding substantial assets which rightfully belonged to Holocaust survivors, the Swiss government officially established a $71 million special compensation fund for Holocaust victims this week. Continue reading

  • February 27, 1997  

    The Senate Commerce Committee heard testimony today about the new TV ratings system in response to a growing number of complaints from both inside and outside Congress that the system is too vague. Continue reading

  • February 26, 1997  

    Marian Anderson was one of the greatest voices in opera, but she was denied a wider audience due to the racism and segregation of her era. A report on Anderson’s life follows. Continue reading

  • February 26, 1997  

    Marian Anderson was one of the greatest voices in opera of all time, but she was denied a wider audience due to the racism and segregation of her era. Charlayne Hunter-Gault explores the life of an artist with her nephew and a fellow singer on the 100th anniversary of her birthday. Continue reading

  • February 25, 1997  

    Paul Solman of WGBH-Boston celebrates composer Franz Schubert’s 200th birthday and his epic song cycle. Continue reading

  • February 20, 1997  

    In a Newsmaker interview with Jeffrey Kaye of KCET-Los Angeles, AFL-CIO President John Sweeney discusses efforts to stop the decline in union membership and what issues are facing working Americans. Continue reading

  • February 20, 1997  

    A Tennessee judge ruled that new technology could determine whether James Earl Ray’s rifle killed civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968. Ray, 68, pleaded guilty to murder in 1969 but reversed himself almost immediately and has been requesting a trial ever since. Continue reading

  • February 20, 1997  

    A Tennessee judge ruled that new technology could determine whether James Earl Ray’s rifle killed civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968. Ray, 68, pleaded guilty to murder in 1969 but reversed himself almost immediately and has been requesting a trial ever since. Jesse Jackson joins the debate. Continue reading

  • February 19, 1997  

    Margaret Warner is joined by Stuart Taylor to discuss two recent decisions handed down by the Supreme Court on Wednesday. One involves the rights surrounding those involved in the abortion debate, and another on religious freedoms. Continue reading