Economy

  • July 29, 2005  

    Congress pushes a series of legislation through, including the passage of a new energy bill and highway spending bill Friday, as it prepares for the month-long August recess. Continue reading

  • July 29, 2005  

    Syndicated Columnist Mark Shields and National Review Senior Editor Ramesh Ponnuru discuss the passage of the new energy bill, CAFTA, the gun liability bill and the ongoing labor union dispute. Continue reading

  • July 27, 2005  

    President Bush visited Capitol Hill Wednesday to urge lawmakers to pass the Central American Free Trade Agreement, which some legislators fear will threaten jobs. Experts make the case for and against the trade agreement. Continue reading

  • July 27, 2005  

    Essayist Clarence Page considers if there really are jobs no one wants. Continue reading

  • July 26, 2005  

    Frontline/World presents a report on the case of a Pakistani businessman accused of trying to smuggle nuclear weapons triggers out of the United States. Continue reading

  • July 26, 2005  

    New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer announced Monday that Sony BMG Music Entertainment will pay $10 million in fines for using “payola,” or bribing radio stations with cash, trips and gifts to play specific artists on the air. An expert discusses the frequency of payola in the radio industry. Continue reading

  • July 25, 2005  

    The International Brotherhood of Teamsters and the Service Employees International Union announced Monday that they are withdrawing from labor union federation AFL-CIO, citing disputes over the labor movement’s future. Representatives from both sides discuss the split. Continue reading

  • July 21, 2005   BY  

    The Chinese government said Thursday it is moving to a more flexible exchange system that ties its currency, the yuan, to a marketbasket of currencies rather than linking it at a fixed rate to the U.S. dollar. Continue reading

  • July 21, 2005  

    The Chinese government said Thursday it is moving to a more flexible exchange system that ties its currency, the yuan, to a marketbasket of currencies rather than linking it at a fixed rate to the U.S. dollar. Experts assess the Chinese government’s decision. Continue reading

  • July 20, 2005  

    The House is set to vote on the Central American Free Trade Agreement. Some U.S. dairy farmers believe CAFTA will help business, while some sugar farmers disagree. Continue reading