Economy

  • August 5, 2005  

    The Labor Department reported Friday that job growth in the U.S. was better than expected. Employers added more than 200,000 new jobs; figures for May and June were also better than first reported. An economist discusses the report and what these new numbers mean. Continue reading

  • August 5, 2005  

    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks discuss the recess appointment of John Bolton as the U.S. envoy to the United Nations, mounting casualties in Iraq and other developments in the political arena. Continue reading

  • August 2, 2005   BY  

    Chinese oil company CNOOC withdrew its $18.5 billion bid for U.S. oil and gas producer Unocal on Tuesday, surrendering to political opposition and leaving American oil company Chevron poised to take over Unocal for about $17.3 billion. Continue reading

  • August 1, 2005   BY  

    A national land summit, called by the South African government to assess the success of its program to return land confiscated during apartheid to black farmers, ended Sunday with a resolution. Continue reading

  • July 29, 2005  

    Congress pushes a series of legislation through, including the passage of a new energy bill and highway spending bill Friday, as it prepares for the month-long August recess. Continue reading

  • July 29, 2005  

    Syndicated Columnist Mark Shields and National Review Senior Editor Ramesh Ponnuru discuss the passage of the new energy bill, CAFTA, the gun liability bill and the ongoing labor union dispute. Continue reading

  • July 27, 2005  

    President Bush visited Capitol Hill Wednesday to urge lawmakers to pass the Central American Free Trade Agreement, which some legislators fear will threaten jobs. Experts make the case for and against the trade agreement. Continue reading

  • July 27, 2005  

    Essayist Clarence Page considers if there really are jobs no one wants. Continue reading

  • July 26, 2005  

    Frontline/World presents a report on the case of a Pakistani businessman accused of trying to smuggle nuclear weapons triggers out of the United States. Continue reading

  • July 26, 2005  

    New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer announced Monday that Sony BMG Music Entertainment will pay $10 million in fines for using “payola,” or bribing radio stations with cash, trips and gifts to play specific artists on the air. An expert discusses the frequency of payola in the radio industry. Continue reading